Vineyards – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:06:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Vineyards – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ 32 32 Ed Hyder’s Wine Director Offers Vacation Choices https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ed-hyders-wine-director-offers-vacation-choices/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 10:06:14 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ed-hyders-wine-director-offers-vacation-choices/ By Barbara M. Houle Ahead of the holidays and in the spirit of the season, Justus Wagner, Wine Manager at Ed Hyder’s Mediterranean Market in Worcester, shares wine recommendations for this most festive time of year. The Dining In column asked Wagner for wines to offer or simply to enjoy with a meal. He has […]]]>

By Barbara M. Houle

Ahead of the holidays and in the spirit of the season, Justus Wagner, Wine Manager at Ed Hyder’s Mediterranean Market in Worcester, shares wine recommendations for this most festive time of year.

The Dining In column asked Wagner for wines to offer or simply to enjoy with a meal. He has selected wines that deliver too much for their price, delicious and affordable. The $ 20 to $ 30 price range makes these wines perfect for the holidays or to open at a family reunion or other special occasion. Wagner noted that the wines and cider on his list are organically grown, which means no pesticides or synthetics were used in the vineyard or orchard.

Wagner of Princeton grew up in the Worcester area and was a customer at Hyder’s before becoming a full-time employee four years ago. After earning a bachelor’s degree in education, he worked a harvest at Bella Vineyards, a small winery in Dry Creek Valley, northern California, Sonoma County. He was captivated by the entire wine-making process, he said, prompting him to research and learn as much as possible about wine.


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Minivan incident alarms SSA motorists https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/minivan-incident-alarms-ssa-motorists/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 19:23:09 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/minivan-incident-alarms-ssa-motorists/ A Philadelphia couple and their dogs were left hanging over a gap between a ferry and a transfer bridge at the Steamship Authority’s Vineyard Haven terminal on Saturday morning. The Island Home, the SSA’s largest ferry, was removed from the Slip 2 as the couple’s minivan, a Chrysler Pacifica hybrid, boarded the ship. SSA spokesman […]]]>

A Philadelphia couple and their dogs were left hanging over a gap between a ferry and a transfer bridge at the Steamship Authority’s Vineyard Haven terminal on Saturday morning.

The Island Home, the SSA’s largest ferry, was removed from the Slip 2 as the couple’s minivan, a Chrysler Pacifica hybrid, boarded the ship. SSA spokesman Sean Driscoll did not explain why Island Home pulled out, but admitted to the incident.

The bridge suffered a cable break on Friday evening, for reasons that are unclear. When asked if the SSA would allow vehicles to cross a bridge the next day with a broken cable, Driscoll said that “some action” had been taken, but essentially, yes, vehicles were allowed to cross a broken bridge. In an email to The Times, no mention was made of cable.

While loading the 9:30 am departure from the MV Island Home on Saturday, November 27, the vessel unexpectedly moved slightly away from the Slip 2 transfer deck in Vineyard Haven as the MV Katama docked in Slip 1, the north. slip into the terminal, “Driscoll wrote.” A passenger car was being driven aboard the MV Island Home at the time. The ship’s crew immediately intervened and pulled other vehicles off the deck. transfer while the vessel was repositioned. Approximately 3 minutes later, the vehicle was able to board the vessel safely and the rest of the loading continued without incident. The Steamship Authority is taking the safety of its passengers and crew crew very seriously and thoroughly investigated the incident, no injuries or damage were reported.

Jim and Marie Logue were leaving for home at the end of their annual Thanksgiving on the vineyard. Marie Logue said she and her husband were driving on the ferry and had to pull over at the top of the transfer bridge as vehicles in front were ordered to park. When her husband tried to pull forward after stopping, the rear wheels started to slip on the bridge. One of the sailors said, “Don’t move! She told The Times.

“As the front end of our car climbed onto the ferry, there was sort of a clicking noise – I don’t know what it was,” Logue said. “I couldn’t back the car, nor go forward. ”

“We really had no idea what was going on,” said Marie. “And then they started in what I would describe as full emergency mode. A whole bunch of them showed up and they were screaming for the cars to back up the ramp… waiting for us saying, Don’t move. And then I looked out the window and I could see water under the car.

Marie said a crew member told her everything would be fine. She remembers someone else saying a cable broke. Jim said he heard that the same cable that broke the night before had “come undone”.

As the van was suspended over the space, Marie said she believed that if the vehicle fell in the harbor, she and her husband could escape, but she was not so sure of their two. dogs.

“Once the cars got off the ramp, you could feel the ramp going up,” said Marie. Jim said it helped stabilize the van.

Someone got on the ferry, Marie said, and got hold of the captain, and the captain pulled the ferry back up to the deck and closed the breach.

“And then we continued,” said Marie. Later, as they were leaving the ferry at Woods Hole, a deckhand said to Marie and Jim, “Hey, you should buy a lottery ticket …”

“I have to say they handled the situation very well,” said Marie. “They were lively. They seemed to know what they were doing. It didn’t seem like it was the first time.

Marie said she contacted SSA by email on Sunday morning: “I didn’t hear anything. Our car was not damaged, but I just want someone to say, we’re sorry that happened. It was terrifying.

Marie also said that no one there explained what happened.

“All of them were beyond excellence,” Jim said of the crew’s response to the emergency.

When asked if it was a scary experience, Jim replied, “Like anything of this nature, your adrenaline goes up a bit.”

Jim described the event as unprecedented in his personal experience. “I’ve been coming to Martha’s Vineyard since June 1957,” Jim said. “Every year of my life, more than once a year most of these years.” At that time, Jim said, “nothing like this ever happened.”

Cable breaks

On Friday, November 26, a cable supporting the transfer bridge at the Steamship Authority’s Vineyard Haven Terminal broke. The incident happened in or around the last race on Friday night, Terminal Officer Leigh Cormie said. At 9.45am Saturday, a two-person SSA crew was at work on the bridge. Cormie said at the time that the repair was moments from the end. “There were no delays or cancellations,” SSA spokesman Sean Driscoll previously told The Times. Driscoll later said the bridge was back in service by noon on Saturday. When The Times inquired about the cable over the weekend, the SSA never mentioned anything about the minibus incident. It wasn’t until the couple contacted the newspaper that the incident came to light. In May 2020, a cable to the same broken transfer bridge and sent a 20,000 pound counterweight block into Vineyard Haven Harbor. This incident nailed the Martha’s Vineyard ferry below deck.

The SSA has been cautious about video footage of this incident, repeatedly refusing to release the footage to The Times. The SSA claimed the images are exempt from disclosure under the state’s public archives law.


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CS: December 2021 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/cs-december-2021/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 02:57:13 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/cs-december-2021/ CELLAR SELECTED December 1, 2021 Rich Pickings: Succulent package of sparkling wine and dessert During the vineyards 2018 Traditional Raw Method, Dundee Hills Light gold in jewel tones with a complex layering of flavors and aromas. Lemongrass shows freshness on the nose with the earthy richness of sweet hay and stone fruit. Blood orange and […]]]>
CELLAR SELECTED

Rich Pickings: Succulent package of sparkling wine and dessert


During the vineyards 2018 Traditional Raw Method, Dundee Hills

Light gold in jewel tones with a complex layering of flavors and aromas. Lemongrass shows freshness on the nose with the earthy richness of sweet hay and stone fruit. Blood orange and rose balance a crisp lemony acidity. A fruity sensation of fleshy melon emerges on the mid-palate and passes to a clean, damp stone finish of eternal bubbles. $ 60; 256 cases

Apolloni vineyards NV Method Italiano Sparkling Rosé from Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley

Superb shade of an autumn sunset with an equally nice and crisp presentation. Light fruity notes of strawberry, watermelon and cranberry are embellished with a hint of white pepper. The aromas are repeated and accentuate on a tangy and fresh palate with a pleasant spicy foam. $ 38; 75 cases

Hyland Estates 2018 Method Champenoise Brut from a single vineyard, McMinnville

A real shade of champagne with warm aromas of marzipan, yellow apple and cream. Dry but rich in the mouth. Almond and marzipan flavors are enhanced by grapefruit acidity, gasoline, salinity and a lemony finish with lingering bubbles. $ 58; 200 cases

Bernau Estate 2017 Method Champenoise Brut Rosé, Willamette Valley

Pretty with a slipper pink hue and a rose petal nose with notes of strawberry, tangerine and apricot. The peachy white tea and the rose float on the finest of bubbles. Decadent, but not sweet, with a fresh orange and tangerine finish. $ 75; 736 cases

St. Innocent Vineyard 2016 Traditional Method Brut, Willamette Valley

Golden in every way with a bright, shiny color and aromas of Rumpelstiltskin quality sweet straw, amber honey, brioche and toasted grains. On the palate, a foam that fills the mouth reveals the fruity sweetness of golden raisins, toasted and honeyed cereals, and intense flavors of peach. $ 60; 125 cases

R. Stuart & Co. NV Klipsun Vineyard Cab Sauvignon Dessert Wine, Washington

On the nose, earthy aromas meet unsweetened cocoa, graham crackers and purple grapes. A perfect balance of sweetness on the palate as the bitter cocoa combines with richer milk chocolate, vanilla, expensive cocktail cherry and toasted nuts sprinkled with cinnamon sugar. $ 35; 33 cases

Remy wines 2011 Beneficio 10 years old in barrels of Barbera, Washington dessert wine

Soft and sweet scents of vanilla, cocoa and pipe tobacco blend with plum sauce, dried dates and dried figs. Sweet and earthy dried fruit continues on the palate with cinnamon, candied apple, cocoa, smoked chipotle and a refreshing orange juice finish. $ 35; 51 cases

Iris Vineyards 2018 Quinta Do Calice, Rogue Valley

An enveloping blend of warm aromas offers a generous pinch of cinnamon and cloves, plump plum compote, smoked chipotle pepper, a fresh green note of bell pepper and premium salted black licorice. The palate is slightly sweet, of an accessible richness and balanced with velvety tannins, flavors of orange studded with cloves, toasted anise, vanilla bean, leather, blackberry and citrus prune. $ 29.99; 120 cases (The blend contains 32% Syrah, 24% Touriga Nacional, 18% Tinta Roriz, 14% Cabernet Franc, 12% Tinta Cao)


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Hunter Valley’s Briar Ridge Embraces Mediterranean Varieties and New Growing Styles | Newcastle Herald https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/hunter-valleys-briar-ridge-embraces-mediterranean-varieties-and-new-growing-styles-newcastle-herald/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 03:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/hunter-valleys-briar-ridge-embraces-mediterranean-varieties-and-new-growing-styles-newcastle-herald/ our-newcastle, food, hunter valley, briar ridge A silent ray of sunlight shines on the lush, flourishing vines twisting and turning, through the relatively high vineyard of Briar Ridge in Mount View, in the Hunter Valley. Fresh shoots of the Spanish grape, albarino, grow just a few feet from rows of fiano, an intriguing Italian grape […]]]>

our-newcastle, food, hunter valley, briar ridge

A silent ray of sunlight shines on the lush, flourishing vines twisting and turning, through the relatively high vineyard of Briar Ridge in Mount View, in the Hunter Valley. Fresh shoots of the Spanish grape, albarino, grow just a few feet from rows of fiano, an intriguing Italian grape from the Campania coastal region. More often than not, these two Mediterranean descendants find favor in the palates of wine lovers from Hunter Valley, mingling freely on bench tops and tables with more traditional grape varieties, such as Semillon. “Taking a leaf from Chris Tyrrell’s book, the Hunter Valley is one of those wine regions where winemakers understand that to make the best you have to know the best, and I think that sentiment really applies to our vineyards. here in Mount View, ”says Briar Ridge winemaker Alex Beckett. Born and raised in the Hunter, Beckett has spent years learning the ins and outs of the wine industry. From selling at the cellar door, to winemaking practices and winemaking in the cellar itself, to obtaining a degree in viticulture from the University of Adelaide and obtaining several scholarships and rewards along the way. As a Briar Ridge winemaker, Beckett is dedicated to advancing the quality of winemaking by passionately focusing on changing the fundamentals of their production style. “In seeking to capture the essence and character of the vineyards and the vintage, I took inspiration from some of the great European producers who are leading the charge towards authenticity without sacrificing quality,” he says. “Recently, we introduced the use of ambient yeasts (rather than cultured yeast in sachets), to really let the site express itself, and we wanted to let the wines age longer in vats or in barrels in order to better shape them, and eliminate the need for bonding agents. ” The result is a recent release of white wines just in time for longer, hotter and wetter days. Zesty lemon with a crunchy nectarine crunch whipped by the salty sea spray brings a fresh feel to Beckett’s Briar Ridge Albarino 2021 ($ 30). “For me,” says Beckett, “a lot of the strain’s character is released from the skins, which gives off such an intense scent and texture.” Likewise, the 2021 Briar Ridge Fiano ($ 30), smoother than the rest, while retaining that lean acidic hold tinged with orange and honeysuckle, pear and freshly grated ginger spice. “The goal here was to really develop this lovely honey, waxy character, while using the natural phenolic compounds of fiano to shape the wine and give it structure.” An eye for the future means nothing without a trained eye on the past. The Briar Ridge Stockhausen Semillon 2021 ($ 35), made in honor of Hunter Valley wine legend Karl Stockhausen, is a classic thirst crusher, cut along lines of fine acid embellished with lemony floral blossoms and persistent lime. “’Sem’ is all about purity, for me,” says Beckett. “Similar to ’16, ’21s are great now, but I think they’ll really hit their stride in four to six years.” Our reporters work hard to provide local and up-to-date news to the community. Here’s how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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FOOD


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Stressed about planning a vacation? These “travel clubs” promise VIP-style service and benefits https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/stressed-about-planning-a-vacation-these-travel-clubs-promise-vip-style-service-and-benefits/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/stressed-about-planning-a-vacation-these-travel-clubs-promise-vip-style-service-and-benefits/ MARIE-FRANCE DALY has a subscription for almost everything. The McLean, Va. Life coach uses her Amazon Prime membership to shop. Netflix and Hulu entertain her on demand. Blinkist keeps her informed by sending summaries of non-fiction books, and Insight Timer, a wellness app, keeps her centered. And this winter, when she takes three of her […]]]>

MARIE-FRANCE DALY has a subscription for almost everything. The McLean, Va. Life coach uses her Amazon Prime membership to shop. Netflix and Hulu entertain her on demand. Blinkist keeps her informed by sending summaries of non-fiction books, and Insight Timer, a wellness app, keeps her centered. And this winter, when she takes three of her children to Paris for a stay in the sumptuous Regina Louvre hotel, she will count on yet another subscription: to the Inspirato travel service. For $ 2,500 per month, the Inspirato Pass program gives high-end travelers access to thousands of homes and hotels, with added perks and concierge service anytime, anywhere. “I was talking about buying a condo on the beach somewhere that would have cost about the same as Inspirato,” Ms. Daly said, “but I didn’t want to be tied to just one property. ”

Beyond Inspirato, airlines, hotels, travel planning services and booking platforms have started offering subscription models in recent years, expanding even further during this time of global upheaval. pandemic. For many people, paying monthly or annually to access exclusive accommodations, services, or discounts frees them from the analysis paralysis that comes with trying to understand an extremely complex and crowded marketplace. Indeed, they pay to have less choice but better choices in planning their trips.


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Paso Robles Winery Presents Seasonal Wine Giveaways and Comfortable Customer Experience • Atascadero News https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/paso-robles-winery-presents-seasonal-wine-giveaways-and-comfortable-customer-experience-atascadero-news/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 00:38:17 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/paso-robles-winery-presents-seasonal-wine-giveaways-and-comfortable-customer-experience-atascadero-news/ PASO ROBLES – Opolo Vineyards is getting into the holiday spirit this year with plenty of seasonal gift packs as well as a comfortable guest experience for those who want to treat themselves to a happy afternoon of food and wine. Opolo’s gift Opolo’s Holiday Gift Sets offer a perfect solution to taking the stress […]]]>

PASO ROBLES – Opolo Vineyards is getting into the holiday spirit this year with plenty of seasonal gift packs as well as a comfortable guest experience for those who want to treat themselves to a happy afternoon of food and wine.

Opolo’s gift

Opolo’s Holiday Gift Sets offer a perfect solution to taking the stress out of holiday shopping. “We’ve mixed and matched our most popular wines in themed gift boxes to make wine offering easier than ever,” said Dave Nichols, co-owner of Opolo Vineyards.

Each package comes in an elegant black handcrafted display box and can include personalized messages upon request. All packages are available on Opolo.com and in the winery tasting room at 7110 Vineyard Drive in Paso Robles in the Willow Creek AVA.

Go through this together, Atascadero

The gift boxes include the “Opolo White Christmas” trio pack including Viognier, Chardonnay and Blanc de Blancs sparkling wine, as well as the “Holiday Dinner Pairing” trio pack which includes the iconic Mountain Zinfandel, the red blend “Fusion” Syrah -Cabernet, and the Italian red mixture “Montagna Mare”.

Other packs include “Best of Opolo” and “Bordeaux” gift boxes and, of course, a “Zinfandel Holiday” gift box highlighting the mastery of the Zinfandel grape variety.

Wine and gastronomic experience

An afternoon at Opolo Vineyards continues to be a treat during the holiday season, with patio dining, multiple tasting experiences, and a secluded vibe surrounded by Opolo Estate vineyards and mountainous terrain.

Signature menu offerings include wood-fired pizzas, artisan cheeses, specialty salads, and sausage platters, all with table service and nearby heat lamps when needed. Tastings include flights of five Opolo wines as well as the chance to sample spirits from the on-site affiliated Willow Creek Distillery.

“Our goal is to provide one of the most welcoming and memorable experiences in the Paso Robles wine country,” said Rick Quinn, co-owner of the winery. “Go out with family and friends during the holidays to get away from it all and create memories together. “


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Rediscover the old vines of Argentina – the drinks business https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/rediscover-the-old-vines-of-argentina-the-drinks-business/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 09:14:22 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/rediscover-the-old-vines-of-argentina-the-drinks-business/ Argentina is home to many wine treasures, but its wealth of old vineyards, many of which are over 100 years old, are perhaps the most valuable. Vineyards in Las Compuertas, Luján de Cuyo, Mendoza. (Credit: Garcia Betancourt) According to the Observatorio Vitivinícola Argentino, about a third of all Argentine vineyards are at least 40 years […]]]>

Argentina is home to many wine treasures, but its wealth of old vineyards, many of which are over 100 years old, are perhaps the most valuable.

Vineyards in Las Compuertas, Luján de Cuyo, Mendoza. (Credit: Garcia Betancourt)

According to the Observatorio Vitivinícola Argentino, about a third of all Argentine vineyards are at least 40 years old, many of them over 100 years old. What sets the old vines of Argentina apart is that they are ungrafted and grown from mass selected vines, rather than clonal material. They do not bear the burden of phylloxera and therefore offer a genetic makeup that other wine producing countries simply cannot reproduce.

“3,800 ha of Argentine vineyards are over 80 years old and 13,000 ha between 60 and 80 years old. That’s quite a feat for a wine country, ”says Madeleine Stenwreth, Master of Wine and Argentine wine consultant. Some 43,000 ha are between 40 and 60 years old, or about 20% of the total plantations.

“It’s unique in a global context,” says Stenwreth. “However, few growers use it to communicate their USP. There’s a lot more talk of elevation and soils rich in calcium carbonate. It almost feels like they take it for granted that they have such a treasure trove of old vines.

Why are old vines so special?

Old vines have had decades to adapt to their climate, allowing a vineyard to produce grapes that ripen steadily to produce more concentrated and intense flavors, with quality increasing year by year, despite declining yields. .

“I am totally convinced that old vines that have stood the test of time have deserved the opportunity to really get old,” adds Stenwreth. “They naturally become less productive with age, so the quality of the fruit must have been good enough for the winemaker to have kept the vines in the ground.”

There is no legal requirement as to what constitutes an old vine in Argentina, but it is widely accepted that terms like old vines, old vineyards, viñas viejas, or old vines apply to wines made from vines at less than half a century.

“Highlighting the age of the vines brings into play an important aspect of a wine’s heritage,” adds Stenwreth. “Respect for heritage is more important than ever, especially given the historic loss of vineyards due to trends that come and go. Once these treasures are uprooted, there is no turning back.

“There is so much grandeur to be found in Lujan de Cuyo”

Most of Argentina’s old vines are concentrated in Mendoza, the epicenter of historic wine production, particularly in Luján de Cuyo. Here one finds an abundance of low trained vineyards planted in the 1920s.

“It has been too easy to forget these more traditional areas amid the hype of high altitude vineyards further south in the Uco Valley,” says Stenwreth. “Producers, as well as sommeliers and international communicators, need to remember not to just highlight the ‘new neighborhood kids’ in the ‘new’ hot spots. There is so much grandeur to be found in Lujan de Cuyo.

Lagarde is one of Mendoza’s most historic producers, using grapes from 115-year-old vines at his Finca Drummond vineyard in Mayor Drummond, producing Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon under his Primeras Viñas label.

Lujan from the sky (Photo credit: Carlos Calise)

Vistalba is one of the most historic sub-regions of Luján de Cuyo, home to some of Argentina’s oldest vineyards.

Trivento produces its Eolo Malbec here from selected plots from a vineyard planted in 1912. De Ángeles produces a range of Malbec from selected plots planted in 1924, while Kaiken’s MAI label is made from grapes sourced from a 125-year-old vineyard.

Nieto Senetiner’s Don Nicanor Single Vineyard Malbec Finca Villa Blanca is made from vines planted in 1900. While Bodega Norton produces a single Malbec vineyard – Lote Agrelo – from 98 year old vines.

Trapiche winemaker Daniel Pi, the driving force behind Argentina’s quest for a single Malbec vineyard, works with local producers such as the Coletto family in the Uco Valley, to produce wines from old vines. This gave rise to two Malbecs from a single vineyard: Trapiche Terroir Series Coletto Malbec from 60-year-old vines; and Trapiche Terroir Series Orellana, from a 70-year-old high altitude vineyard.

The Angelica de Catena vineyard was planted in 1930 with Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon in Maipu, Mendoza, and played an important role in preserving genetic material for future generations as part of a larger planting program. .

“In recent years, we have been exposed to beautiful wines made by a young and dynamic generation of winemakers such as brothers Michelini and German Massera, as well as by very experienced winemakers such as Roberto de la Mota,” adds Stenwreth. .

Winemaker Roberto de la Mota, from Mendel, produces Malbec from vines planted in 1928, as well as a 70 to 80-year-old Semillon of ungrafted vines from three different sub-regions of the Uco Valley: Altamira , La Consulta and San Carlos.

A group of winegrowers that includes Matias Riccitelli (República del Malbec), Cheval des Andes, Luigi Bosca (Finca los Nobles) and the winegrowers of the Durigutti family (Proyecto Las Compuertas) are also working to protect the vineyards planted in 1927 in Las Compuertas , in the upper reaches of Lujan de Cuyo.

Uco Valley

The Uco Valley is known for its modern approach to winemaking, but here too a wealth of historic vineyards can be found, and at great elevations too.

Pamela Alfonso, winemaker in Alta Vista, makes a trio of unique vineyard wines from vineyards over 70 years old in Las Compuertas and El Cepillo in the Uco Valley, and a third from Agrelo in Mendoza. “Our vineyards are unique because they have had more than 100 years to adapt to their terroir,” explains Alfonso. “They are in perfect balance with their climate and their soil and the grapes thus reach optimum maturity. Such genetics cannot be found anywhere else in the world.

In Tupungato, Atamisque produces wines from old vines under its Catalpa line, including a 70-year-old Malbec from vines and another from 50-year-old Cabernet Sauvignon in San José. Rutini makes excellent use of vines aged up to 80 years in the Gualtallary, Altamira and La Consulta sub-regions of the Uco Valley for his Antologia series.

Other producers include those founded by Jeff Mausbach and Alejandro Sejanovich (former alum of Bodega Catena Zapata). Their Tinto Negro winery produces 1955 Malbec Vineyard from vines planted in La Consulta in 1956 at an altitude of 3000 m. Their smaller Bodega Teho label includes Grand Cru Le Velours – a very limited Malbec made from vines planted in 1940 in La Consulta.

Northern Argentina

Vineyards in Salta. (Credit: Garcia Betancourt)

In the north, the extreme age of the vines rubs shoulders with the extreme altitude.

“I have tasted some incredible wines from very old vines in northern Argentina, like Torrontés and Criolla,” recalls Stenwreth, which stands out from the densely fruity and extracted wine styles that are typically found in the top of the range.

Bodega el Esteco, in Cafayate, was one of the first to separate the old plots of Torrontés and Criolla, followed by Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon, using concrete eggs to allow the fruit to express levels of quality “unpublished”, she adds.

The Vieilles Vignes range from El Esteco is made up of wines from vines planted between 1945 and 1958; Torrontés 1945, Criolla 1958, Malbec 1946 and Cabernet Sauvignon 1947.

Colomé, in the Calchaquí Valley, has a vineyard originally planted in 1831, used to produce its Colomé 1831 Malbec. A Cabernet Sauvignon is also planned.

Agustín Lanús Wines, in Cafayate, produces a range of wines from old vines, including Sunal Ilogico Criolla Chica, made from vines planted in 1906.

“For me, old vines symbolize balance; the tannins are much rounder and more complex and the complexity and aromatic compounds are more intense ”, explains Lanús. “The vine is intelligent enough when ripe to balance the yield, so it gives lower yields than young vines, but higher concentration and complexity. “

Criolla vines planted in 1906 (Credit: Vins Agustin Lanus)

Patagonia

Further south, Patagonia is home to several vineyards over 100 years old, with old vines of Semillon, Trousseau, Pinot Noir and Malbec. Here, the Rio Negro is the epicenter of the production of old vines.

Matías Riccitelli started a project here in 2015, resulting in an old-vine Semillon, Merlot and Malbec from vines planted in Rio Negro in the late 1960s. Its Vieilles Vignes de Patagonie range has recently expanded to include include a Bastardo and a Torrontés following the discovery of another vineyard dating from the mid-20th century.

Another pioneer in the region is winemaker Hans Vinding-Diers, who stumbled upon a ‘once in a lifetime’ pre-phylloxera vineyard planted in 1932 in 1998. This resulted in the founding of Bodega Noemia, in the province of Neuquen. from the Rio Negro valley. , and its flagship product Noemia Malbec.

Nearby, Bodegas Chacra produces a Pinot Noir from vines planted between 1932 and 1955, while its neighbor Humberto Canale produces Old Vine wines from Malbec, Pinot Noir, Riesling and Sémillon planted between 1937 and 1969.

Old vines ‘indispensable’ for the future of wine in Argentina

Adrianna Catena sums up the importance of old Argentinian vines well, having won an award for her essay on her family’s Angelica vineyard for Jancis Robinsons’ 2021 wine writing competition.

“Argentina may not be the first place that comes to mind when you think of old vines, but I hope this award will shine a light on this treasure that is ours, in its breadth and depth. value of our old vineyards, especially in relation to genetic diversity, “she says.

“With their resilience and adaptability, old vines show us the way forward. The study and preservation of this heritage are essential for the future of wine in Argentina.

Their survival is a story of adaptation and perseverance. The old vines are invaluable for the search for quality and an irreplaceable part of Argentina’s wine heritage.


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Napa-Based Falconer Forms Association of Professional Falconers to Share Resources and Set Industry Standards | Local News https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/napa-based-falconer-forms-association-of-professional-falconers-to-share-resources-and-set-industry-standards-local-news/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/napa-based-falconer-forms-association-of-professional-falconers-to-share-resources-and-set-industry-standards-local-news/ Professional falconers are used around the world to protect agriculture from pests, and here in Napa Valley they are commonly called upon to rid the vineyards of the wine country of creatures like rabbits, starlings and crows. . And while these benefits are extremely important in protecting the area’s high-value vines, there is no Better […]]]>

Professional falconers are used around the world to protect agriculture from pests, and here in Napa Valley they are commonly called upon to rid the vineyards of the wine country of creatures like rabbits, starlings and crows. .

And while these benefits are extremely important in protecting the area’s high-value vines, there is no Better Business Bureau for people arguing with birds of prey, leaving the code of ethics to individuals. .

But as a titular falconer in the Bay Area, Authentic Abatement’s Rebecca Rosen is fed up with the ‘used car salesman’ mentality that surrounds falconry and decided to do something about it by forming the Professional Falconers Association ( PFA).

A non-profit professional association of falconry companies and professional falconers, the PFA will offer a range of benefits to members of the industry, including access to job sites, training resources, a marketplace for raptors, learning resources and inclusion in network members. phone book.

“I have high hopes for the PFA because I feel like it’s so necessary,” Rosen said. “After all, professional falconry has been around almost as long as falconry itself.”

“As soon as people started using bird messengers for hunting, someone was hired to go and trap the bird,” she said. “We look at medieval times and the King’s Falconer. It was a job. The ancient monks cleaned the bell towers of pigeons with their hawks… Even in medieval Europe, there was this social class with falconry.

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So far, Rosen has done the heavy lifting of setting up the PFA and preparing for membership, and is now making progress in building a repository of trusted people that clients think they can trust. In addition, Rosen and the PFA will also establish a series of resources and learning opportunities for industry players.

“This is the hardest part, though,” she said, “getting people to share techniques. “

“Everyone wants to be the absolute best, and they don’t want to improve their competition, not realizing that if their competition fails, the whole industry just has a bad image… If something bad happens, that client won’t go and say, “Oh, well, that falconer sucks”, they’re going to say, “The hawks don’t work; let’s clean up. ‘”

So, by defining a code of ethics – which can now be viewed on the PFA website – while screening members and providing them with the resources they need to be successful, Rosen hopes to uplift the entire falconry community instead. than just herself and her business. And while willpower is important to make this happen, it must also convince other professionals that this is an idea worth supporting.

“This old school mentality is tough, and when it comes to training resources we have all these people who think they’ve been in the industry long enough that they have nothing more to learn. Rosen said. “But I think those are probably the people who have the most to learn.”

In addition to the discount, Rosen has a general love for birds and falconry, and hosts demonstrations at different venues and wineries whenever she can. Since 2016, she has had a concert with Bouchaine Vineyards, where guests come for the “Falconry in the Garden” event to sip wine and watch Rosen show off her various hawks, hawks and owls.

“Education has always been very important to me,” she said. “Because if I encourage a little kid to become a falconer someday, falconry doesn’t die. “

So, by highlighting these positive experiences in falconry outside of its reduction work and striving to maintain a certain standard for professionals through PFA, Rosen is determined to create a good reputation for her industry.

To learn more about the PFA, visit profalconers.com.

American Canyon in Napa County has a trail around an old landfill that offers views of the wetlands and is approximately 2.5 miles.



Barry eberling





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Beaujolais Nouveau affected by supply chain problems https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/beaujolais-nouveau-affected-by-supply-chain-problems/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 15:41:54 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/beaujolais-nouveau-affected-by-supply-chain-problems/ Bottles of the 2016 Beaujolais Nouveau vintage are on display during a countdown in Tokyo on November 17, 2016. Yoshikazu Tsuno | Gamma-Rapho | Getty Images WASHINGTON – Every year, on the third Thursday in November, at exactly 12:01 am, the French bring out their famous first wine of the harvest – the crisp and […]]]>

Bottles of the 2016 Beaujolais Nouveau vintage are on display during a countdown in Tokyo on November 17, 2016.

Yoshikazu Tsuno | Gamma-Rapho | Getty Images

WASHINGTON – Every year, on the third Thursday in November, at exactly 12:01 am, the French bring out their famous first wine of the harvest – the crisp and fruity Beaujolais Nouveau.

This year, American wine lovers woke up to a Beaujolais Nouveau market hampered by supply chain issues that have become all too common in today’s economy, particularly driver shortages and other shipping issues.

And all of this translates into cost increases for suppliers and consumers alike.

“There are definitely issues with the supply chain. There is always an issue with the containers and there is always a space issue on the ships, but it’s been really tough this year,” said Dennis. Kreps, co-founder of importer Quintessential Wines, which is based in Napa Valley, California.

The market was already at a disadvantage due to climatic issues. Beaujolais Nouveau production has fallen by nearly 50% this year due to spring frosts and hail, followed by drought.

“It’s kind of a phenomenon that’s happening all over the world right now,” Kreps said. “I know some of the numbers in France in particular are down dramatically in all regions. Beaujolais has been one of the hardest hit.”

Delicate grapes, difficult problems

Kreps, the exclusive American importer of the eminent wine merchant Georges Duboeuf, coordinates with a small team the colossal logistics of distributing the wine to American retailers according to the precise French calendar.

In Beaujolais, considered a sub-region of Burgundy, vineyards line around 42,000 hectares of low granite hills north of Lyon, in eastern France.

This is where thin-skinned magenta gamay reigns supreme and Georges Duboeuf reigns supreme.

Duboeuf, affectionately known as “Papa du Beaujolais”, has the Gamay grapes harvested by hand in September. A rapid fermentation follows and bottling in October.

A picker cuts grapes in a Beaujolais vineyard in eastern France in early September 3, 2018, during this year’s first Beaujolais harvest.

Philippe Desmazes | AFP | Getty Images

Beaujolais Nouveau – generally light in body with a juicy and fruity palate – is then shipped worldwide and staged for its debut in November.

First, Beaujolais suppliers had to secure the containers to start shipping. Then they worried about delays in ports.

“You can’t control the backlog in ports,” Kreps said.

A ship was diverted from New York to Norfolk, Virginia due to a major backup, he said. The ship to New York typically carries the majority of the wine intended for distribution across the country, Kreps added.

“Then we had to reroute all the drivers and trucks from New York to Norfolk, then get the containers off the ship and send these guys straight to the west coast,” Kreps said.

They also had problems hiring qualified drivers due to a labor shortage, he said.

“We’ve never had a problem before, but a truck overturned, so everything on that container was lost,” he said. “So unfortunately all of the Arkansas wine has been lost, most of the Memphis wine has been lost, and I think a lot of the wine from West Virginia has been lost.”

Beaujolais grapes rest in a basket in the “Moulin a Vent” vineyard, near Chenas, Beaujolais, eastern France, on August 26, 2015, after this year’s first Beaujolais harvest.

Jean-Philippe Ksiazek | AFP | Getty Images

Yet even with all the supply and production issues – shipping costs tripled and the cost of the fruit itself was also significantly higher – a bottle of Beaujolais Nouveau will sell for a slightly higher retail price this year. than usual, Kreps said.

“We had already committed to pricing all of our wholesalers, wholesalers call retailers, retailers then committed to quantities,” he said. “Now is not the time to come back to them with increased costs. So we worked with the cellar and ate the cost. “

Kreps had a positive message for people who can get their hands on a bottle of Beaujolais Nouveau: Despite all the difficulties with the supply chain and the small harvest, he said, “the quality is fantastic.”


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Nicholson Vineyards 2019 Brooks Block Pinot Noir is a savory, dark delight https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/nicholson-vineyards-2019-brooks-block-pinot-noir-is-a-savory-dark-delight/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 23:07:54 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/nicholson-vineyards-2019-brooks-block-pinot-noir-is-a-savory-dark-delight/ Nicholson Vineyards, established in 2004, produces superb wines. Their 2019 Brooks Block Estate Pinot Noir ($ 55) is a dark, flavorful beauty that will thrill you right off the bat. Intense aromas of wild raspberry and blackberry lead to a supple palate of cremini mushrooms and ripe tannins.“It is a wine that represents the uniqueness […]]]>

Nicholson Vineyards, established in 2004, produces superb wines.

Their 2019 Brooks Block Estate Pinot Noir ($ 55) is a dark, flavorful beauty that will thrill you right off the bat. Intense aromas of wild raspberry and blackberry lead to a supple palate of cremini mushrooms and ripe tannins.
“It is a wine that represents the uniqueness of the terroir and the climate of sun, soil and morning ocean mist that creates exceptional fruit,” say owners Marguerite and Brian Nicholson. And with the holidays approaching, you can’t go wrong with this pinot; it’s well done, it’s local and it’s delicious.

Years ago, when the Nicholsons first started commissioning their property, they saw wild peacocks roaming the park and stumbled upon a collection of feathers. Admiring their beauty, they opted for a colorful peacock feather on every label, including this 2019 Pinot Noir.

Nicholson Vineyards also produces a rich Il Boschetto olive oil from the trees on his estate. It comes with wonderful flavors of green leaf, lemongrass and black pepper spice and is available in their charming tasting room.

Nicholson Vineyards, 2800 Pleasant Valley Road, Aptos, 831-724-7071. Nicholsonvineyards.com

Stockwell Cellars Fall Case Sale

For $ 150, create your own mixing box from various goodies: Sauvignon Blanc 2017, Pinot Gris 2018, Rosé de Pinot Noir 2018, Pinot Noir 2016, Merlot 2016. Cost: $ 150 per case. Wednesday, November 24 is Thanksgiving Retail Day. You will be able to choose your favorite wines for all your festive dinners. (No wine tasting that day.)
Stockwell Cellars, 1100 Fair Ave., Santa Cruz. 831-818-9075. stockwellcellars.com.

Wrights Station Winery Black FridayBlack Friday is White Weekend at Wrights Station. All white wines will be 50% off from November 26 to 28. Join them on Sunday December 12 for their Holiday Open House. The local Mattia Pizza Truck will be on hand to sell their mouthwatering pies. Everyone is welcome, but Wine Club members get additional benefits and discounts.
Wrights Station Winery, 24250 Loma Prieta Ave., Los Gatos, 408-560-9343. wrightsstation.com.


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