Italian Wine – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ Thu, 19 May 2022 01:34:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Italian Wine – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ 32 32 How a love affair with Italian grapes changed Australian Murray Darling wine https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/how-a-love-affair-with-italian-grapes-changed-australian-murray-darling-wine/ Thu, 19 May 2022 01:34:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/how-a-love-affair-with-italian-grapes-changed-australian-murray-darling-wine/ McCarthy’s new role took him to Mildura, where Southcorp began sourcing pinot grigio for the rapidly expanding T’Gallant brand. And one of the biggest suppliers of pinot grigio was Denis Pasut. “I spent a lot of time talking to Denis,” McCarthy said. “And one day I said to him — basically as a throwaway line, […]]]>

McCarthy’s new role took him to Mildura, where Southcorp began sourcing pinot grigio for the rapidly expanding T’Gallant brand. And one of the biggest suppliers of pinot grigio was Denis Pasut.

“I spent a lot of time talking to Denis,” McCarthy said. “And one day I said to him — basically as a throwaway line, ‘You don’t have a friulano, do you?'”

“You don’t have a friulano, do you?” McCarthy, right, asked Denis Pasut at one point. The rest is history. Eddie Ablett

Quealy met Pasut around the same time at the Alternative Variety Wine Show in Mildura. She visited his vineyard because he told her he had all these “wacky varieties growing there”, and discovered that one of them was Friulano.

So Quealy and McCarthy took cuttings of Pasut, planted them on the peninsula, and began producing wines from them. These are wines that were influenced by another trip to Italy – to Friuli and neighboring Slovenia, visiting producers such as Josko Gravner, who fermented and aged their white wines on skins for long periods of time.

As I wrote at the time, and re-emphasized in this column a few years ago, the couple’s first Australian white skin contact people – Pobblebonk from Quealy, Claudius from T’Gallant – were “tremendously important, brave and inspiring”. Then, in the late 2000s, they were as revolutionary as their first pinots grigios had been 15 years earlier.

McCarthy on the banks of the Murray River. He credits the pioneering thinking of the Chalmers family and Denis Pasut for allowing him to look at this largely dry part of Australia differently.

Today, 15 years later, the wine market in Australia is very different. Whites on skin contact – sometimes amber, often cloudy – are a familiar sight in any bar, restaurant or bottle shop that claims to be even vaguely trendy.

So in early 2020, when Kevin McCarthy (by then a long time departed from Treasury Wine Estates) began dreaming up a new brand of wine in partnership with his daughter, marketer Celia McCarthy, the couple decided to implement value the Italian grapes – especially the skin – contact whites – grown in Mildura.

The first version included a 2021 Friulano, from the vineyard of Denis Pasut, which spent 11 days on the skins. It won the trophy for best wine made from grapes grown in the Murray Darling region at last year’s Alternative Varieties Wine Show.

The recent second release, labeled MDI (“Murray Darling/Italy,” says McCarthy) consists of seven small-batch wines, including five whites that have spent varying amounts of time on the skins. Most of these new wines are made from grapes grown by the Chalmers family at their vineyard near Merbein: the Chalmers have spent the past three decades importing, propagating and distributing alternative varieties to winemakers across the country, as well as to make and sell their own wines. .

McCarthy with her daughter, marketer Celia McCarthy. Adrian Lander

It’s important to McCarthy that winemakers get full credit for these wines. It’s thanks to the pioneering spirit of the Chalmers family and Denis Pasut that winemakers like him can choose from a wider range of varietals and imagine new ways to view warm interior regions like the Murray. Darling.

“Denis was on the cutting edge when he planted friulano all those years ago,” says McCarthy, pouring a glass of wine made from the grapes Pasut grew. “It took incredible foresight. He came back from Italy in the 80s with a vision that was “- he takes a sip -” basically that.

The skin in the game

Three exceptional white wines in contact with the skin from MDI Wines.

2021 MDI Ansonica [Mildura]
I tasted fat, golden ansonica grapes on the vine at Chalmers Vineyard during this year’s vintage, and was completely won over by the rich, exotic flavors of the variety. And I was very excited to find those same seductive flavors in the wine that Kevin McCarthy made from this last vineyard vintage: very dry, but with seemingly sweet, pulpy, and spicy marmalade characters. Wonderful. 17 days on the skins. $29

2021 MDI Favorita Fiano Garganega [Mildura]
Since the early days of their T’Gallant label, Kevin McCarthy and Kathleen Quealy have often embraced the weirdness and darkness when it comes to naming their wines (I mean, “T’Gallant”? What were they thinking? they ?). It is therefore good to see that the tradition is very much alive here: favorita is the Piedmontese synonym of vermentino (an alternative name for an alternative variety: How? ‘Or’ What alternative…), and it’s blended here with fiano and garganega to produce a thrillingly precise, fine, crystalline dry white wine you’d never guess had spent 170 days on the skins. $24

2021 MDI Ribolla Gialla [Mildura]
You can see why ribolla gialla is the most revered white grape variety in the regions of Friuli and Slovenia, where there is a tradition of wines with long skin contact: it spent 192 days on the skins, but the wine is beautifully floral, crisp and utterly delicious. , with a lot of finesse, freshness and concentration and a superb long and creamy finish. “That’s Gravner’s mantra,” McCarthy says. “The longer you leave it on the skin, the silkier it becomes.” $29

mdi.vin

MUST KNOW
In July, MDI Wines will open a cellar door at At The Above, a multi-purpose venue at 198 Gertrude Street, Fitzroy owned by SpaceBetween, the creative partners of the MDI project.

“We will be open the first Saturday of each month and for special events,” says Celia McCarthy. “The plan is to show MDI wines, and some special guest wines, regions, producers and styles that have inspired us.”

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This B Corporation-certified winery signals high standards, even at $10 a bottle https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/this-b-corporation-certified-winery-signals-high-standards-even-at-10-a-bottle/ Tue, 17 May 2022 09:12:11 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/this-b-corporation-certified-winery-signals-high-standards-even-at-10-a-bottle/ Over the past decade, it has become increasingly difficult to find well-crafted wines around $10 a bottle. Since some of the easiest ways to keep prices down are to increase crop yields with chemical sprays or exploit seasonal farm workers, it seemed almost impossible to find decent $10 bottles made by a company. that can […]]]>

Over the past decade, it has become increasingly difficult to find well-crafted wines around $10 a bottle. Since some of the easiest ways to keep prices down are to increase crop yields with chemical sprays or exploit seasonal farm workers, it seemed almost impossible to find decent $10 bottles made by a company. that can credibly claim to be environmentally and socially responsible.

Fortunately, there is a great resource for those looking to align their wine consumption with their values, the “B Corp” movement. This initiative is led by the B Labs association, which is inspired by a famous quote from Stephen Hawking: “There is no planet B”.

READ MORE: Triple Bottom Becomes Pennsylvania’s First Certified B Corp Brewery

B Labs is based on the idea that the company could lead the way to a better future by moving to a new model that takes into account the needs of other stakeholders in addition to its sole shareholders, such as employees, communities neighbors or customers. To date, B Labs has certified over 50 wine companies as “B Corporations” to meet high standards of social and environmental performance, accountability and transparency. Among these, the most important is Concha y Toro, Chile’s leading wine producer.

For decades, family-owned Concha y Toro has been known for reliably delivering well-made wines that taste great at all price points. Their “Casillero del Diablo” line is hard to beat around the $10 mark, like with this delicious merlot. Like many Chilean reds, it has a flavor profile that is not as dry as most Italian or French wines, nor as jammy as many American or Argentine wines. A beautifully balanced dry red that is soft and velvety on the palate, this Merlot is loaded with flavors of dark cherries and dark chocolate. And now that Concha y Toro has earned its stripes as a B Corporation, you can also feel better about how you spend your wine.

$8.99, 13.5% alcohol

PLCB Item #8441

Sale price until May 29 – regularly $10.99

Also available on:

Joe Canal’s in Lawrenceville; $9.99, lawrenceville.jcanals.com

Total Wine & More in Claymont; $9.99, www.totalwine.com

Canal’s in Mount Ephraim; $9.99, mycanals.com

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The next generation: why Slovenian wine is the one to watch for 2022 and beyond https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/the-next-generation-why-slovenian-wine-is-the-one-to-watch-for-2022-and-beyond/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:53:12 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/the-next-generation-why-slovenian-wine-is-the-one-to-watch-for-2022-and-beyond/ Once upon a time, wine lists were, quite literally, the domain of historic, well-established chateaux. But in recent years, consumers have become increasingly excited about non-Orthodox. While it’s hard to imagine a world where famous Bordeaux and Burgundy vintages are shunned from a commercial cellar, curious wine lovers are increasingly looking for something “a little […]]]>

Once upon a time, wine lists were, quite literally, the domain of historic, well-established chateaux. But in recent years, consumers have become increasingly excited about non-Orthodox.

While it’s hard to imagine a world where famous Bordeaux and Burgundy vintages are shunned from a commercial cellar, curious wine lovers are increasingly looking for something “a little different.” “.

And even if it takes a long time for a new region to establish itself in the mouth, it is lesser known wine centers like Slovenia that will become the discerning drinker’s choice over time.

This is largely due to the growing popularity of natural wines. But there is also a trend towards easy-drinking wines, perhaps linked to the end of confinement. Slovenia performs really well in these two key areas.

One of the highlights of Slovenian viticulture is the Vipava Valley. And the winemaker with the hottest profile on the market right now is Primož Lavrenčič.

Unpretentious but deeply passionate, Lavrenčič has a vision that transfers to the glass.

“I try to take a step back and understand how to encourage nature, especially the soil, to express its own character in my wines,” he says. Indeed, its vines obey strict biodynamic rules, which places it as a message for contemporary viticulture. But he is not on a bandwagon, he really believes in the principles and in his terroir.

He even built a fascinating underground window, where visitors to the winery can see the stratification of the earth beneath the vineyard.

The soils of the Vipava Valley have slowly evolved over flysch marls and sandstones over 50 million years old. And that’s good news for viticulture.

Natural wines are often described as wines with “minimal intervention” from the human hand. Winemakers like Lavrenčič largely leave nature alone, only making adjustments to fermentation temperature and other viticultural factors such as the level of oxygen exposure a wine might have.

The Vipava Valley is in the western part of Slovenia, near the Italian border. Water and winds, as usual, are a natural factor in the vineyards.

The Vipava River runs through the center of the valley to empty into the Soca River, reflecting light and heat to help ripen the grapes in the sub-Mediterranean climate.

The ‘Bora’ is the strongest wind with gusts sometimes exceeding 200 km/h, making it the windiest part of Slovenia. And this factor is useful for winegrowers who do not want to pollute their grapes with pesticides. No pest is going to cling to a vine for very long when the Bora threatens the landscape.

The most memorable Burja wine for me was the 2020 Zelen. Nature taking its course is part of the grape selection here. Zelen is not a grape that many people have heard of, but it is a native grape variety and as such has developed resistance to wind. You can pick up a bottle of this waxy, tangy, smoky minx for under $20.

To pass the baton

One of the most exciting discoveries among the vineyards of western Slovenia was not so much related to vines but people.

An initiative allowing winegrowers to pass on their activities to their children has been sanctioned by the Slovenian government since 2014 as the Rural Development Programme. It allows a grant of €45,000 per beneficiary. It was set up for young farmers, so it’s not just wine growers that are affected, but it’s really taken off in the wine sector. And financially, it makes sense for older winemakers to pass the business on to their children while still being able to continue in the business as consultants. As Andrej Erzetič of Erzetič Wines told Euronews Culture, “the winery is like a kitchen, you can only have one chef”.

Based in the charming Brda wine region, Aleksij Erzetič handed over the main winemaking and estate management to his son Andrej a few years ago and the young winemaker has never looked back.

Andrej flies the flag for native varietals like Belo and the rare Rebula Nero (which has something of Cabernet Franc), but also enjoys experimenting with classic grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon and Chardonnay. And there is certainly a serious investment because the room of amphoras below would not have been cheap.

Amphoras have become very popular very suddenly in the wine world, but they are not new. They were the favorite aging tanks in Georgia, the birthplace of winemaking, 6,000 years ago.

“I sometimes prefer amphora aging to barrel aging because of the shape and the presence of microorganisms,” Andrej explains.

Amphoras are made of clay: more generous than a steel tank, which does not interact with wine at the molecular level, and less changeable than oak, which can add its own flavors and aromatic compounds to a wine.

Erzetič also likes to experiment with different woods, so try to find the perfect partnership with his grapes. Again, not cheap, but it’s an entertaining place to visit and his passion is evident. Visitors to the domain (totally recommended) will find a miasma of colors and materials, a real kaleidoscope forest made up of barrels of acacia, mulberry, ash and cherry.

Back in Vipava, I met more young winegrowers and took part in a new local tourism and education initiative, becoming a “winemaker for a day”. For many wine lovers like me, this is a rare treat. Tasting is one thing, but knowing all the steps before opening a bottle becomes more and more fascinating the further you look beyond the liquid.

Andraz Ferjancic took over the reins from his father in 2019. He takes visitors through the stages of winemaking up to the planting of the vines.

And it’s not just a token role-playing game, you’ll actually be planting a vine that will make wine in three to five years. But first you need to clear the ground. You have to put the hard yards. Well, I did. Apparently it’s optional, but I didn’t find out until later…

Slovenian winemakers often grow more than one type of grape and therefore have a choice of blend. In this experiment, I was given three white wines to blend, and ended up with my own wine to take home which included 70% Zelen and 30% Malvasia.

While it is certainly Slovenia’s natural wines that will be very trendy and increasingly in demand, perhaps even worldwide as buyers become more interested in them, there is also a positivity to this transfer to young winegrowers. The trend towards low ABV wines made to be easy to drink is, I believe, not a passing fad, and this wine zeitgeist is the perfect arena for young superstars like Andrej and Andraž to thrive.

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Dolce Riveria in Dallas reopens after 800 days of closure https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/dolce-riveria-in-dallas-reopens-after-800-days-of-closure/ Fri, 13 May 2022 17:19:25 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/dolce-riveria-in-dallas-reopens-after-800-days-of-closure/ The pandemic has taken its toll on many restaurants in Dallas and Fort Worth. Too many closed favorites forever. Too many workers have been laid off. And now that we’re living in the new normal, too many places are feeling the negative impact of supply chain issues and labor shortages. Amid the chaos the hospitality […]]]>

The pandemic has taken its toll on many restaurants in Dallas and Fort Worth. Too many closed favorites forever. Too many workers have been laid off. And now that we’re living in the new normal, too many places are feeling the negative impact of supply chain issues and labor shortages. Amid the chaos the hospitality industry continues to face, Southern Italian-inspired Dolce Riveria in the Harwood district is reopening this week after nearly 800 days of closure.

It sounds like an unlikely story. The Harwood Hospitality Group has made the strategic decision to close all of its restaurants during the mandatory restaurant closures in 2020 and to use this time to make changes. For Dolce Riveria, that meant a redesigned dining room, the addition of a wine and cocktail tasting room called The Parlor, and a new menu under Executive Chef Paul Latkowski.

The new Dolce Riveria dining room.
Kathy Tran

“It’s a reopening but there’s energy and excitement with a brand new opening,” Warren Richards, vice president of hospitality at Harwood Hospitality, told Eater Dallas. He attributes the energy to chef Latkowski, who worked with the group’s executive chef, Taylor Kearney, to dream up a new menu focused on upscale coastal Italian fare.

“We’ve doubled our pasta program,” says Richards. “We are going to have nine different types of fresh pasta every day. There’s definitely a seafood-centric focus on the menu, but there’s still plenty of those familiar classics that people enjoy.

Lemon trees add a touch of freshness to the Dolce Rivera patio.  Seats with white and blue cushions rest under them.

The Dolce Rivera patio, with lemon trees floating above the pergola.
Kathy Tran

Part of the reason Dolce Riveria and its parent companies have been able to maintain the restaurant during such a long shutdown is because it owns, rather than rents, all of the real estate in which it operates. This allowed them to pick the perfect time to open to the public again. “As the temperature rises, everyone heads into summer vacation mode and that’s what Dolce Riviera is,” says Richards. “It’s such a beautiful outdoor space and it made sense in this late spring/early summer time for people to come here and feel like they’re on vacation.”

This weather allowed Harwood to rework the patio as well, installing lemon trees that had time to grow in the pergola above. “Personally, for me to see restaurants across the country reopening with these beautiful outdoor spaces — I think that’s something that all of our customers are missing,” says Richards.

He also revealed that the new patio dining area includes a roof that can be opened, weather permitting, to give guests a view of the evening sky.

White upholstered chairs sit at tables with blue checkered tablecloths under the retractable roof on the Dolce Riveria's outdoor terrace

The patio for dining at Dolce Riveria, with a retractable roof.
Kathy Tran

A new addition to the space is a warm and intimate room called The Parlor. Richards explains that the inspiration for the room was the tradition in southern Italy of going for a cocktail or an aperitif between the end of work and before dinner, to open the stomach. But the room only holds 15 to 20 customers.

“The Parlor allows our guests to come to this cozy and intimate hideaway where you can have a cocktail before dinner, but also come back after dinner when the sun goes down,” says Richards.

Le Parlor, a wine and cocktail bar in Dolce Rivera, is an all-wooden bar with moody lights.

Inside the Parlor, a wine and cocktail bar at the Dolce Rivera.
Kathy Tran

The Parlor will serve traditional Italian cocktails, as well as selections from the new cocktail program, and a carefully curated wine selection that reaches for the high end and champagnes. Some are rare wines with a very high price tag, ranging up to hundreds of dollars a glass. It is also available for private parties.

Dolce Riveria is now open at 2950 N. Harwood Street. Reservations are possible from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Sundays, Wednesdays and Thursdays and from 5 p.m. to midnight on Fridays and Saturdays.

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Stamford’s Taco Daddy owners announce plans for Cugine’s, an Italian restaurant in Harbor Point https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/stamfords-taco-daddy-owners-announce-plans-for-cugines-an-italian-restaurant-in-harbor-point/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:24:05 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/stamfords-taco-daddy-owners-announce-plans-for-cugines-an-italian-restaurant-in-harbor-point/ Stamford restaurateurs John and Morgan Nealon, who own and operate the popular Taco Daddy on Towne Street, are planning a new Italian restaurant, which will open later this spring. Cugine’s Italian will open in the Harbor Point area of ​​southern Stamford with what the Nealons call “seductive, well-prepared Italian cuisine”, fine cocktails and an extensive […]]]>

Stamford restaurateurs John and Morgan Nealon, who own and operate the popular Taco Daddy on Towne Street, are planning a new Italian restaurant, which will open later this spring.

Cugine’s Italian will open in the Harbor Point area of ​​southern Stamford with what the Nealons call “seductive, well-prepared Italian cuisine”, fine cocktails and an extensive wine list.

Cugine’s will replace Nealons’ Lila Rose, a tapas and cocktail spot that opened next to Taco Daddy in September 2020.

Taco Daddy’s eclectic space in Stamford.Caplanson Winter

“Our goal with Cugine’s is to bring not only Harbor Point, but Fairfield County as a whole, a whole new Italian dining experience,” John Nealon said in a statement. “This sophisticated restaurant will invite our guests to step back in time and dine in the days of Frank Sinatra, with dark interiors and furnishings, beautiful soft mood lighting, a vintage playlist and classic Italian cuisine .”

Morgan Nealon said Cugine will offer a chef-led menu with local ingredients and Fairfield County produce.


“While providing the ambience of an exclusive speakeasy, Cugine’s will be comfortable, invite people to connect with one another over exquisite and beautiful cuisine, and will be reminiscent of a classic dining experience at a renowned Italian restaurant in New York City. ” she said in a statement.

Lila Rose closed on May 8, the Nealons said.

“It provided the escape we’ve all needed for the past two years, but we’re thrilled to open the doors to this completely redesigned and unique concept,” said Morgan Nealon.

Cugine’s, at 121 Towne Street, will be open Friday through Sunday for dinner service, expanding to offer brunch shortly after. Follow updates on Instagram at @cuginesitalian.

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The Italian version of fondue is so delicious that there is no wine, just cheese https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/the-italian-version-of-fondue-is-so-delicious-that-there-is-no-wine-just-cheese/ Mon, 09 May 2022 00:54:53 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/the-italian-version-of-fondue-is-so-delicious-that-there-is-no-wine-just-cheese/ Editor’s Note – Don’t miss “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy,” airing Sundays at 9 p.m. ET. Tucci travels Italy to discover the secrets and delights of the country’s regional cuisines. (CNN) — The Swiss are famous for fondue, but their Italian neighbors have their own version of this delicious melted cheese dish. The traditional Swiss […]]]>
Editor’s Note – Don’t miss “Stanley Tucci: Searching for Italy,” airing Sundays at 9 p.m. ET. Tucci travels Italy to discover the secrets and delights of the country’s regional cuisines.

(CNN) — The Swiss are famous for fondue, but their Italian neighbors have their own version of this delicious melted cheese dish.

The traditional Swiss version melts a variety of cheeses with wine and a little cornstarch for a smooth texture. Then the cheese mixture is put in a pan rubbed with a cut clove of garlic and seasoned with nutmeg and black pepper.

But on the other side of the Alps, in the Valle d’Aosta region, the Italians have their own version of fondue called fonduta.

Instead of Emmental and Gruyère, the Italians only use one cheese: fontina.

La Fontina is a creamy semi-hard cheese with a mild nutty taste.

“Italian fontina cheese from cows fed on sweet grass, high up in those mountains, makes the fondue so luscious it doesn’t need the white wine they add in France or Switzerland,” said Stanley Tucci. .

“Oh my God, this is so good,” Tucci said as she dipped her bread into the hot pot. “So delicious!”

(Left to right) Local sommelier and teacher Cecilia Lazzarotto and Tucci share a meal of regional specialties from the Aosta Valley at the Alpage restaurant.

Matt Holyoak

Aosta Valley Fonduta

(Aosta Valley Fondue)

If you want to add a gourmet touch, garnish the fondue with freshly grated black truffles, in season from December to early March and available in specialized online stores. As an alternative, try pre-sliced ​​truffle flakes, available online year-round.

Makes 2 servings

Ingredients

2 ¼ cups | 500 grams of fontina

2 cups | 500 milliliters of milk

4 egg yolks

1 ¼ tablespoons | 10 grams of all-purpose flour

Black truffle flakes, preferably freshly grated (optional)

Accompaniments

Boiled potatoes

Toasted croutons

Equipment

Bain-marie or bain-marie

Fondue pot

Fondue gel fuel (if the pot is not electric)

Instructions

1. Start by removing the outer crust from the fontina, then slice it thinly. Cut the fontina into cubes and transfer the cheese to a rectangular baking dish and pour the milk over it.

2. Drain cheese and set aside excess milk for later (in step four). Put the cheese cubes in a saucepan. Fill a double boiler with water and make sure the water does not touch the bottom of the pan. This space between the water and the food keeps the temperature constant and prevents the food from overheating. Then place the pan on top and cook the fontina over medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon, until the cheese is melted, 10-15 minutes. At first you will see a mass, then gradually the cheese will melt and become more fluid.

3. Once you have reached the desired consistency, pour in the egg yolks one at a time, then add the flour and mix continuously.

4. Add the remaining milk from stage two as needed to ensure the consistency is smooth and creamy.

5. Stir well and cook for another 10 minutes. Finally, remove from the heat and stir in the cheese mixture.

6. Once ready, pour the fondue into the fondue pot. If you are using a fondue pot with a burner, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for preparing and lighting gel fuel at the base under the pot that will keep the fondue hot and retain its fluid consistency.

7. Serve the fondue immediately, still hot, with boiled potatoes and grilled croutons.

8. Flavor the fondue with truffle flakes, if desired.

This recipe is courtesy of Lorella Tamone of Alpage Restaurant in Breuil-Cervinia, Italy.
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How climate change is changing Australian wine https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/how-climate-change-is-changing-australian-wine/ Sat, 07 May 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/how-climate-change-is-changing-australian-wine/ Australia’s most popular varieties suited to cooler climates – shiraz, chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, pinot noir and sauvignon blanc – may not be as easy to grow as temperatures rise, he adds. Rainfall also plays an important role in wine production. Since 1970, rainfall in south-west Australia from April to October has fallen by 16%, while […]]]>

Australia’s most popular varieties suited to cooler climates – shiraz, chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, pinot noir and sauvignon blanc – may not be as easy to grow as temperatures rise, he adds.

Rainfall also plays an important role in wine production. Since 1970, rainfall in south-west Australia from April to October has fallen by 16%, while in the south-east, rainfall has fallen by 12% in the same months since the 1990s. In the future, rain events are expected to become more intense, aggravated by climatic factors like La Niña and an atmosphere that can hold 7% more humidity for each degree of warming.

“We would have [weather] events – and this is where they talk about climate change – you expect to see once every 10 years, you could have a bad freeze or a really wet year,” says Chambers. “We now get them back to back or more frequently.”

Dr. Christopher Davies, CSIRO team leader at Agriculture and Food, says hail, unseasonal rain and temperature fluctuations present a challenge for wine producers. They can lead to an increase in botrytis (which discolours wine from red to orange) or mold which affects photosynthesis and reduces wine quality.

For NSW’s Hunter Valley, Wine Australia’s Climate Atlas analysis found that average rainfall during the 2081-2100 growing seasons is expected to be around 55 millimeters higher than the 1997-2017 average. Temperatures over the same period are expected to rise by 3 degrees. Similar changes are expected at Mudgee and Orange.

By contrast, in Victoria’s wine region of Rutherglen, average rainfall over these growing seasons will be 20 millimeters below the 1997-2017 average. Temperatures are expected to climb 3.4 degrees over the same period. In the Yarra Valley, average rainfall could decrease by 66 mm, while temperatures are expected to increase by 3 degrees.

Prior to 1998, the Chambers’ 25-hectare property was not irrigated at all, relying on annual rainfall. “Have been [now] highly dependent on irrigation to keep the vines healthy and viable throughout the heat period.

Adaptation and mitigation

Dr Liz Waters, Managing Director of Research, Development and Adoption at Wine Australia, says the industry has been adapting to climate change for over a decade: “The beauty of wine is that it reflects the region in which it is grown and [its] climate.”

The goal for the industry now is to continue to evolve to meet new challenges. Growing varieties that are better suited to warmer climates is just one strategy.

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NSW Wine Industry Association chairman Mark Bourne said varieties from the Mediterranean are better able to hold their acid in extreme heat and withstand drier conditions. Italian white wine fiano and tempranillo, a Spanish variety that yields a full-bodied red, have become more popular in recent years for this reason and people are willing to pay for them, he says. (The Chambers vineyard now includes Tempranillo.)

In the Central Highlands region of NSW, See Saw Wine co-owner Justin Jarrett has vineyards at 700m, 800m and 900m above sea level to capture a range of different climates. For every 100 meters, the temperature increases by about 1 to 1.5 degrees, he says.

When Jarrett and his wife Pip started their winery 25 years ago, they grew Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling grapes in the lower vineyard and found that the same grapes in the upper vineyard were not thriving. But as the years passed and the climate warmed, the couple stopped using the 700-meter vineyard for their white wine, which now prefers the higher altitudes.

The other notable change is that the harvest season has been reduced from 8-12 weeks to six.

Over the past 25 years, Justin Jarrett has noticed changes in the way he grows and manages his NSW vineyard.Credit:Monique Lovick

“Harvest time is the time of joy for all farmers, it’s when you look at your year’s work and say to yourself, ‘wow, we made it,'” Jarrett says.

“You think to yourself, ‘if I can sustain this for the next 20 years, it will be very exciting’… But what you see today cannot be what will happen in 20 years.”

The couple have started growing other types of crops between the vines, such as turnips and peas to increase carbon in the soil, and are determined to make the business carbon positive in the years to come.

“If you’re not sustainable, consumers won’t drink”

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Despite growers’ efforts to introduce new varieties, one key factor remains beyond their control: consumer tastes.

Australians don’t yet know fiano, albarino or tempranillo as they do with shiraz or sauvignon blanc. Davies says what’s particularly interesting about Australians’ drinking habits is that they’re more drawn to grape variety and region, rather than winery. This is at odds with most European consumers, who tend to care about chateau or vintage.

But the industry is confident the new range of strains is something consumers – especially younger ones – will embrace with open arms, especially if they know it has been sustainably produced.

“Consumers actually want us to start making this change. They look at your brand values,” says Battaglene. “If you’re not looking to become sustainable, consumers won’t drink your product.”

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The national wine industry is developing an emissions roadmap to set achievable reduction targets and help the industry achieve them. The sector aims to have net zero carbon emissions by 2050, but wants to get there sooner than that.

For Chambers, the focus on sustainability is more than just a marketing ploy: [where] someone’s word is no longer good enough. You must have another certification to potentially save these comments. People are aware of greenwashing issues.

Chambers Rosewood is working to achieve certification, which Chambers says is a formalization of practices it has already implemented.

For his part, Jarrett remains hopeful for the future of the wine industry. “In Australia the agriculture industry has been a great adapter and I think we will continue to be,” he says. “We have these [climate] problems… but what matters is what we are going to do about it.

When asked what his favorite wine is, he laughs as he asks, “What’s your favorite child?”

A guide to the environment, what’s happening to it, what’s being done about it and what it means for the future. Subscribe to our bimonthly Environment newsletter here.

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Wine evenings and Mediterranean delights https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wine-evenings-and-mediterranean-delights/ Thu, 05 May 2022 03:41:41 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wine-evenings-and-mediterranean-delights/ Food Guide for Mediterranean Spring Break By Mindy Long and Tai Zheng May. 4, 2022 Lunch at Di Più (Nice, France) around the chittara shrimp. MINDY LONG — TECHNOLOGY During spring break, we had the chance to visit Spain and the French Riviera, gorging ourselves on sangria, chuletón, churros and everything in between. We would […]]]>

Food Guide for Mediterranean Spring Break

Lunch at Di Più (Nice, France) around the chittara shrimp.

MINDY LONG — TECHNOLOGY

During spring break, we had the chance to visit Spain and the French Riviera, gorging ourselves on sangria, chuletón, churros and everything in between. We would like to share a summary of four restaurants and bars that stood out for us.

Our first meal in Nice, France was at a seaside Italian restaurant called Di Più. With views of pastel mountainside houses against the azure waves of the Mediterranean, we expected a meal as beautiful as the ambiance. Di Più did not disappoint. I ordered a chittara shrimp and a floating island for the lunch. Chittara shrimp was seafood pasta, about twice as thick as spaghetti, with prawns, calamari and Roma tomatoes and sprinkled with a spray of pistachio crumbs. The dish was served on a large black ceramic plate that looked more like a shield than a dinner plate. The pasta was perfectly cooked – al dente – and the prawns and calamari were tender and flavorful. The tomatoes ensured the pasta was not dry and provided a natural sweetness, while the pistachios added a slight crunch and uniqueness to the dish. The floating island was a traditional French dessert consisting of meringue floating on custard. The meringue was extremely light and the cream left no trace of its egg origins. The meringue was also sprinkled with popcorn, which in turn was lightly drizzled with caramel. The floating island was surprisingly low in sugar and rather very light, making it the perfect ending to a fulfilling meal.

Tai bet on the dish of the day. Many French restaurants offer a special plate of the day depending on the ingredients they are able to source. His bet was rewarded with a perfectly grilled, medium-rare cut of lean steak with grilled au gratin potatoes. The portions weren’t as impressive as other Di Più dishes, but the flavor and freshness of the ingredients made the dish satisfying. For dessert Tai doubled down and tried his luck with ice cream and coffee dessert thinking it was affogato. Out came a single espresso and a mini chocolate covered ice cream bar. The homemade ice cream tasted like anything you could get from an American ice cream truck. However, the espresso cup did not disappoint. Its richness and smoothness was something we grew accustomed to in Europe, and our frequent visits to cafes across the continent kept us going.

In Madrid we sampled a wide range of cuisines from all over Spain. On our second night in town, we secured a reservation at La Bola, a restaurant known for its traditional cocido madrileño, a chickpea-based stew with chicken, chorizo, pork belly, and pasta. The dish itself was an experience. First the waiter brought an empty plate and another filled with soft white pasta. Then he presents a mysterious ceramic jar, from which he pours the golden broth into the pasta plate. Finally he removed the lid and all the meat and chickpeas inside cascaded down onto the empty plate. The soup and pasta allowed the taste of the cooked meat to shine through the clean and simple broth. The meat and chickpeas were tender enough to fall apart on the slightest touch; they provided a comforting and hearty ending to the dish. The balance of sangria at La Bola made it the best we had in Spain. We could taste the deep wine flavor in this sangria, but the fruitiness still dampened the expected bitter notes. For dessert, we ordered La Bola’s buñuelos con helado, or apple fritters with ice cream. The donuts were deep fried and coated in caramel, with two scoops of ice cream on the side. The warm and crunchy shells contrasted well with the cold vanilla. It was Tai’s favorite meal of the trip.

On our last night, we dined Andalusian tapas at the Alhambra, a tavern in the heart of Madrid known for its boisterous atmosphere and generous portions. Already stuffed after days of incessant eating, we ordered three dishes to share: platazo de ibéricos, rabo de toro estofado and tapa pisto con bacalao. Platazo de ibéricos was an Iberian charcuterie board, including ham, pork, beef, chorizo, and manchego cheese. Surprisingly, it was our first taste of jamón ibérico during our stopover in Spain, so we decided to try an assortment of jamón that evening. The manchego cheese, creamy and not too salty, was a perfect complement to the savory jamón, our collective favorite being the ham. Rabo de toro estofado, or oxtail stew, was served with fries. The oxtail was covered in a flavorful sauce and the tender meat fell off the bone easily. Finally, the tapa pisto with bacalao, a supposedly smaller tapa dish of smoked cod, capped off our last meal in Europe. The dish was technically a tapa degustación, which meant that the dish would be served on small slices of bread. The cod arrived on the pisto and bread and was drizzled with a sweet local vinegar. Pisto is a dish originating from the region of Castilla La Mancha, where Madrid is located, hence the official name pisto manchego. Similar to ratatouille, it consists of tomatoes, onions, eggplant, red peppers and olive oil. The fresh, sweet cod pairs well with the slightly sweet pisto and was a smash hit among our table. The sangria here reflected the difference between eating at a tapas bar and the historic La Bola. The drink was fruitier and brighter than the more sophisticated La Bola. However, the sangria always paired perfectly with the food and a single pitcher proved insufficient.

Later in the evening, we decided to order cocktails to celebrate the end of the trip. After bar-hopping for the best and most affordable drinks, we ended up at Serafina, where we ordered the Cosmopolitan, the mojito and the caipirinha, along with croquetas jamón iberico, ham croquettes and cheese, to share. I ordered the Cosmopolitan, a cocktail of cranberry juice, vodka and contreau. The juice was watery and not very sweet so for my next drink I ordered the caipirinha. The caiprinha is the national cocktail of Brazil and consists of cachaça, lime and sugar. This drink was refreshing and mixed in such a way that only a hint of alcohol could be detected, the taste blending well with the lime and sugar. Tai ordered a refreshing mojito; the mint, lime, and sugar did a great job of masking the tequila taste. The salty and greasy croquetas were the perfect thing to snack on while we enjoyed our drinks.

The food and drink throughout the trip proved to be the perfect respite from travel and sightseeing. While we rested our weary bodies, we were still able to discover the sights, smells and tastes of the region. These four restaurants showcased the diverse experiences we’ve had in Spain and France, and we’d love to hear recommendations for other travel-defining restaurants around the world!

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Luxury furniture company Giorgetti to open showroom and offices at 349 Fifth – Trade Observer https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/luxury-furniture-company-giorgetti-to-open-showroom-and-offices-at-349-fifth-trade-observer/ Tue, 03 May 2022 13:31:12 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/luxury-furniture-company-giorgetti-to-open-showroom-and-offices-at-349-fifth-trade-observer/ Italian luxury furniture company Giorgetti rented a showroom and offices at 349 Fifth Avenue at the southeast corner of 34th Street for its first Giorgetti Manhattan Workshop. The space includes the entire 8,000 square foot eighth floor penthouse plus exclusive access to a 4,000 square foot rooftop terrace. The 10-year lease had an asking rent […]]]>

Italian luxury furniture company Giorgetti rented a showroom and offices at 349 Fifth Avenue at the southeast corner of 34th Street for its first Giorgetti Manhattan Workshop.

The space includes the entire 8,000 square foot eighth floor penthouse plus exclusive access to a 4,000 square foot rooftop terrace. The 10-year lease had an asking rent of $75 per foot, according to online documents.

Andrew Kahn, Fanny Fan and Jack Pfalzgraf of Cushman and Wakefield represented the tenant.

“We are delighted to have helped Giorgetti expand into the United States with its first showroom in New York,” Khan said. “349 Fifth Avenue has incredible views of the Empire State Building, is conveniently located, and has the only two-story rooftop terrace of any furniture showroom in this neighborhood.”

The owner of the building, Zar Property NYwas represented internally by David Zar, Julien Zar and patrick finn and declined to comment. Zar bought the property from JPMorgan Chase in 2009 for $18.58 million, at which time the bank signed a long-term lease for the retail space.

The 70,000 square foot office building sits across from the Empire State Building. It was featured in the WeWork documentary “WeCrashed” as it was the coworking company’s second location.

The building was recently reconfigured into a high-end office space with a new entrance canopy and a lobby to 2 East 34th Street. Pre-built and custom-built options are available, with the few remaining floors having an asking rent of $59 per foot.

Since fall 2020, Giorgetti USA has been using a two-bedroom model apartment in The power planta 71-story residential condominium in 138 East 50th Street, as headquarters in New York.

According to the CEO Moreno Vitalonithe new space will become a showroom concept that the company describes as “Atelier” and branded as Atelier Giorgetti Manhattan – as well as encompass its offices.

“I was drawn to the building itself for its architecture, the fact that it is conveniently located in the NoMad Design District and therefore easier for commerce to stop and enter. But most of all, I was blown away by the view from the rooftop, literally breathtaking,” Vitaloni wrote via email. “The Empire State Building is just across Fifth Avenue… exactly the same block, just in front. Having such a landmark so close is truly a privilege. We are an extremely high-end Italian lifestyle brand, active in the interior sector (residential, condos , retail, commercial) and we want to provide our customers with “experiences” that are different from visiting a regular showroom to “just” view furniture.”

The Atelier Giorgetti and its rooftop will be places where these experiences will be delivered, he said, from wine tastings to luxury watch collector events and more. “The possibilities are endless and experiences create memories, and I’m sure that will make a difference,” Vitaloni wrote. “The roof will be laid out as a hyper-sophisticated rooftop, with state-of-the-art bio-pergolas and three Giorgetti outdoor vignettes, which could certainly be used by our guests while sipping a glass of Italian wine.”

The company recently ended a collaboration with an independent dealer in the NoMad Design District. Until the new store opens around Labor Day, if supply chains cooperate, it uses temporary space in Midtown.

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10 best sights to see in the most visited countries in the world https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/10-best-sights-to-see-in-the-most-visited-countries-in-the-world/ Sun, 01 May 2022 13:23:48 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/10-best-sights-to-see-in-the-most-visited-countries-in-the-world/ It’s funny how there are countries in the world that seem to tick (almost) everyone’s boxes and draw crowds every year. The World Tourism Organization released a report based on pre-COVID-19 pandemic statistics and revealed that the world’s 10 most visited countries received 40% of arrivals globally. On top ? France. But there are other […]]]>

It’s funny how there are countries in the world that seem to tick (almost) everyone’s boxes and draw crowds every year. The World Tourism Organization released a report based on pre-COVID-19 pandemic statistics and revealed that the world’s 10 most visited countries received 40% of arrivals globally.

On top ? France. But there are other interesting and perhaps surprising contenders in the top 10 spots.

I was lucky enough to have visited all the major countries listed in the report (PDF) and even lived in three of them. Here I want to look at the three most popular sites from each country, tracking the number of visitors posted, but also adding my own suggestions – starting with country number one and working down to number 10.

Eiffel Tower from the Jardins du Trocadéro (Photo credit: PHOTOCREO Michal Bednarek / Shutterstock.com)

1.France

France is well ahead of other countries with some 89 million annual visitors, but that’s hardly surprising, as France seems to be one of those places that almost everyone loves. After all, there are incredible coastlines, snow-capped mountains, wine, food, ancient history, countless castles and, of course, Paris. Top 3 must-haves? In my mind, it’s Paris, still in the running with London for the title of the most visited city in Europe; Provence with its soft hues, cozy countryside and Mediterranean atmosphere; and the Loire with its magnificent castles.

Pro Tip: France, like Italy, is a perfect country to explore on a road trip. Settle into Paris and drive, north, south, west, and don’t forget the east – a car is a great way to see the little sites along the way.

Basila and Expiatory Church of the Holy Family, known as Sagrada Familia at sunset, in Barcelona, ​​Spain.
Sagrada Familia in Barcelona (Photo credit: krivinis / Shutterstock.com)

2. Spain

Spain, with 83 million visitors, comes second, making them two European countries in the top two places. Spain, much like France, offers a range of landscapes, from long beaches to mountain ranges, big cities and lots of amazing history. The number one tourist spot is in what is probably my favorite Spanish city, Barcelona. This is Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia, which after 150 odd years is still unfinished, but is getting more and more magnificent every year. Second is the fabulous La Alhambra in Granada and, if you love art, there is of course the Prado in Madrid. But personally, I would choose the Guggenheim in the charming Basque town of Bilbao because it offers a great little vacation package.

Pro Tip: One of the big attractions is Spain’s many fiestas, but plan carefully because, although a parade or fireworks display always adds to the holiday, shops and attractions often remain closed for days during and around the holidays. festive periods.

Street in Times Square, New York with yellow taxis, daylight.
Times Square (Photo credit: Sina Ettmer Photography / Shutterstock.com)

3. United States of America

The United States follows in third place with 80 million international visitors per year. According to my favorite destination in the United States, New York, the most visited public tourist site in the United States is Times Square, which receives an incredible 50 million visitors each year. The next most visited site is not too far away, in Central Park. But while there are so many natural wonders, like the Grand Canyon and other national parks, the third most visited destination in the United States is actually Las Vegas, even beating the Magic Kingdom in Florida and Disneyland in California. . You can’t argue with the stats, but one of the sites I most want to see is The Wave in Arizona.

Pro Tip: The United States is another country that lends itself to epic and iconic road trips, taking your time and exploring off the beaten path.

The majestic Great Wall of China, Beijing, China.
Great Wall of China (Photo credit: LIUSHENGFILM / Shutterstock.com)

4. China

There is a sharp drop in numbers between third and fourth place, with China receiving “only” 63 million annual visitors. And for such a large country, it’s hard to choose what to see first. My personal favorites of sites I’ve seen before, like the Great Wall, coincide with the statistics, as does my second favorite, the Forbidden City in Beijing. But I still haven’t managed to join the Terracotta Army in Xian. My next favorite place is Hong Kong. Is it China? Officially, yes, but I still consider it a separate entity. Either way, if you’re in China, missing out on the thrill of Hong Kong would be a shame.

Pro Tip: When visiting China, take a long trip and see as much as you can in one go, or use transit visa options for brief layovers and small bites of China.

Colosseum in Rome, Italy.
Colosseum in Rome (Photo credit: Jaroslaw Saternus / Shutterstock.com)

5. Italy

Back in Europe, and with 62 million visitors, Italy comes in fifth place, something that surprises me quite a bit, because what’s not to love about Italy? The countryside, the history, the language and the gastronomy? Tuscany, Venice and Rome? All perfection, in my mind. To be a little more precise, the Colosseum in Rome, the Duomo in Florence and the Grand Canal in Venice occupy the first places of the sites to see in Italy. I can’t argue with these amazing sights, but what I love most about Italy is road tripping through Tuscany, preferably in a convertible, stopping at small villages, tasting local wine and eating too much pasta – enjoying the little things rather than the big sights.

Pro tips: Italy is an ideal country for an extended stay on a small budget. Come out of season, early September is perfect, and stay in a villa in Tuscany, or in Umbria a little cheaper. Rent a tiny Italian car and explore the surroundings. Food and wine are cheap, the sun is free, so what more could you ask for?

Hagia Sophia Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey.
Hagia Sophia (Photo credit: muraart / Shutterstock.com)

6. Turkey

It is quite surprising that Turkey receives “only” 46 million visitors per year because it is such a versatile country. The beaches are hugely popular with Europeans and Istanbul is quite simply one of the greatest cities in the world when it comes to history, architecture and stunning natural surroundings. Unsurprisingly, Turkey’s most visited site is in Istanbul, the charming Hagia Sophia. However, it is sadly now without the resident cat, Gli, who has entertained visitors for years. The ancient Roman city of Ephesus, south of Izmir, is a close second, while magical Cappadocia, with its White Mountains best viewed from a hot air balloon, is also a must visit.

Pro Tip: Turkey’s attractions are quite spread out, but they have a good rail network for long distances and plenty of overnight coach tours that allow you to visit the various sites.

Resort at Isla Mujeres in Cancun, Mexico.
Isla Mujeres in Cancun (Photo credit: Irene Rios Photography / Shutterstock.com)

7. Mexico

Mexico is very similar to Turkey in that there is a decision to be made about whether you go for historical tours or beach vacations. If you look at the most searched phrases on Google, “beach breaks” seem to be the top favorites, with searches for “all-inclusive resorts” and “Cancun” reaching the top spots. Personally, I like a mix of the two and loved a visit to the always popular Cancun, as well as visits to Chichen Itza and other nearby temples. But first place? About 41 million annual tourists love the Teotihuacan Pyramids, which are so easily accessible from the bustling capital.

Pro Tip: Despite a rudimentary knowledge of the Spanish language, the toilets marked with a M threw me first. It means womenas in women, it is not M for men. Good to know if you’re ever in a hurry.

Rheinstein Castle, Trechtingshausen, UNESCO World Heritage Site Upper Middle Rhine Valley, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany.
Rheinstein Castle in the Rhine Valley (Photo credit: Video Media Studio Europe / Shutterstock.com)

8. Germany

Germany is another very diverse country, with mountainous Bavaria to the south, and a more water-oriented north. The most visited attraction is the Rhine Valley, where river cruises pass the many castles and vineyards along the way. Some 39 million tourists explore Germany each year, closely followed by the bustling capital of Berlin and its attractions. Being from Hamburg in the north, I always recommend a visit to the port city, but I also recommend a visit to the many fairy tale towns, such as Rothenburg ob der Tauber, which never disappoint.

Pro Tip: Don’t worry too much about getting your tongue around the German language. The vast majority of Germans speak excellent English.

Landscape of Chiang Mai, Thailand.
Chiang Mai (Photo credit: Take a photo / Shutterstock.com)

9. Thailand

The second Asian competitor in the top 10 is Thailand, with 38 million visitors. The top rated tourist spots in Thailand include the temples of Bangkok, Chiang Mai in the north and, of course, the fabulous beaches, such as those in Krabi Province or on the many islands.

Pro Tip: Thailand is a definite contender for a multi-stop vacation. Bangkok airport is the main hub to fly to, so might as well stay a few days to look around. Then, continue on internal jumps to the north and end on a southern beach to let all the cultural impressions soak in as you please.

Traditional rural houses Cotswold village of Castle Combe, UK.
Cotswold houses (Photo credit: Octus_Photography / Shutterstock.com)

10. United Kingdom

The UK only slips into the top 10, welcoming 36 million visitors a year, although this is 53 million less than France. Must-sees include London, because you’ll probably get there anyway. Then the main sights become more country related, exploring the Cotswolds and the Roman spa town of Bath, Stonehenge ranking first, heading north into Scotland and passing through Yorkshire en route.

Pro Tip: If other countries lend themselves to road trips, the UK practically claims it. Picturesque and quintessentially English villages are found only off the main roads and outside the main towns. There are a plethora of routes to choose from.

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