French Wines – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 17:31:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png French Wines – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ 32 32 NJ restaurant openings including Mochinut and more https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/nj-restaurant-openings-including-mochinut-and-more/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 16:58:07 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/nj-restaurant-openings-including-mochinut-and-more/ We’re happy to announce several openings – and one reopening – that took place this month in the Garden State. Congratulations to the returning children of ESO Artisanal Pasta Co. for reopening after a successful GoFundMe campaign. Read on to learn more about their inspiring journey and all the new restaurants to check out this […]]]>

We’re happy to announce several openings – and one reopening – that took place this month in the Garden State. Congratulations to the returning children of ESO Artisanal Pasta Co. for reopening after a successful GoFundMe campaign. Read on to learn more about their inspiring journey and all the new restaurants to check out this month, and follow each one on social media for ongoing updates and announcements!

Smoked meat and poutine from Berg, Belmar

Berg’s smoked meat and poutine

Berg’s is proud to sell authentic Montreal smoked meats, as well as Canadians’ favorite poutine. On December 1, the restaurant opened a pop-up store instead of Steak Stand (a seasonal location that will reopen next summer). Owner Kevin Newburg’s menu features Montreal-style meat (a type of cured beef brisket) in sandwich form, including Reubens and Black Russians. The restaurant also serves varieties of poutine, fries topped with cheese curds and gravy.

Berg’s smoked meat and poutine
1405, main street
Belmar
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Cree Wine Company, Hampton

Chris cry
Chris cry

Cree Wine Company is not your average wine place. Owner Chris Cree will be opening the wine bar and event space inside the historic Perryville Inn, and he’s offering more than just a few wines. Customers can taste hundreds of different types per bottle, which come from all over the world. Tastes, glasses and flights are also available. Visitors can also indulge in light fare, including cold cuts, as part of a frequently changing menu from executive chef AJ Sankofa.

Cree Wine Company
167 Perryville Road
Hampton
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Maximus Polish Empire Kitchen, Lawrence

Coming soon. this new Polish restaurant in Lawrence will be located in the space formerly held by the Indian restaurant Mehek. No specific date has been announced, but the team is aiming for an opening in January.

Maximus Polish Empire Cuisine
2495 Brunswick Pike
Laurent

Valley Street Restaurant, Maplewood

Valley Street Eatery co-owners, Chef Matt and Chef Sabatino
Valley Street Eatery co-owners, Chef Matt and Chef Sabatino

Valley Street Eatery sees itself as the type of place where “we cook what we want, when we want”. The restaurant serves fresh, high-quality food, and its social networks have promoted items such as a ham, egg and Taylor cheese sandwich, as well as the “VSE” version of a Cuban sandwich. The place also serves salads and soups, vegetarian options and iced coffee.

Restaurant in the valley street
530, rue de la Vallée
Maple wood

Jayce Baudry French Pastry, Montclair

Jayce baudry
Jayce Baudry French Pastry

On Church Street in downtown Montclair, pastry chef Jayce Baudry offers the best of French desserts, including elegant individual candies and personalized cakes. Guests can indulge themselves with macaroons, chocolates and hot drinks. Baudry, from Bordeaux, France, also takes wholesale orders and even ships his goodies nationwide. The boutique also offers personalized advice to restaurants or hotels wishing to improve their dessert programs.

Jayce Baudry French Pastry
17, rue de l’Église
Montclair
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Mochinut, Montclair and Sommet

mochin
Mochinout

Mochinut started as a business in Hawaii and has since expanded to the United States. The concept combines a Japanese mochi (a soft rice bun) with a typical donut. The shop offers flavored mochi donuts, aka Mochinuts, and customers can enjoy options like strawberry funnel, churro, and pistachio, among dozens more. New Jersey is home to five sites, the most recent being Summit and Montclair. The Mochinut website suggests that a location in Princeton is coming soon.

Mochinout
427 Springfield Avenue
Mountain peak

349 Bloomfield Avenue
Montclair

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ESO artisanal pasta, Morristown

ESO artisanal pasta plate
Cavatelli alla Bolognese from ESO Artisanal Pasta

After announcing its closure via social media in September, much to the disappointment of many customers, Morristown’s ESO Artisanal Pasta will reopen on December 7, all thanks to a wave of community support.

ESO’s chief executive, AJ Sankofa, launched a GoFundMe fundraiser in late October. He wrote: “After two months of fighting for everything we have worked so hard for, we were able to get our baby back, now we can’t wait to see him grow!

Chef AJ also warmly thanked the community, “From day one, our community has been the driving force behind our success by showing unprecedented amounts of love and support in every way imaginable. Indeed, the community has contributed over $ 12,000 towards the reopening of the beloved restaurant.

ESO Artisanal Pasta
92A Elm Street
Morristown
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The White Owl Restaurant, Point Pleasant

breakfast plates at white owl restaurant
The white owl restaurant

The White Owl officially opened on December 1 at the place known as Captain Ed’s for many years. The restaurant is scheduled to be open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Menu items include everything from waffles and egg platters and short rib burgers, to entrees like New York strip loin and honey glazed salmon.

The white owl restaurant
1001 Arnold Ave
Pleasant Point



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GrapeStars pays tribute to Jean-Charles Boisset, the driving force behind a new vision of Napa Valley https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/grapestars-pays-tribute-to-jean-charles-boisset-the-driving-force-behind-a-new-vision-of-napa-valley/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 21:23:43 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/grapestars-pays-tribute-to-jean-charles-boisset-the-driving-force-behind-a-new-vision-of-napa-valley/ Written in partnership with GrapeStars The Napa Valley is known the world over for its scenic views and amazing high quality wineries. But there is one man, a Frenchman, who has adopted Napa Valley as his home, and more than anyone else, works tirelessly to promote and promote the vineyards of Napa Valley: Jean-Charles Boisset. […]]]>

Written in partnership with GrapeStars

The Napa Valley is known the world over for its scenic views and amazing high quality wineries. But there is one man, a Frenchman, who has adopted Napa Valley as his home, and more than anyone else, works tirelessly to promote and promote the vineyards of Napa Valley: Jean-Charles Boisset. Since arriving in Napa Valley in 2009, when he purchased Raymond Vineyards, Jean-Charles has sparked enthusiasm, energy, innovation and an exciting vision for Napa Valley as the most dynamic wine destination. to the world, while embracing the history and authenticity of Napa. and Sonoma.

Recently dubbed “The James Bond of Wine” by Forbes magazine, Mr. Boisset is the owner of his family Boisset collection, headquartered in the Napa Valley with wineries in Napa and Sonoma, as well as Burgundy. , Beaujolais, Provence and Rhône. Valley. Jean-Charles is also married to Gina Gallo of the famous Gallo wine family, so he’s as close to Napa Valley royalty as possible, which is why GrapeStars is proud to honor and celebrate his continuing legacy.

Almost everywhere Boisset goes, magic follows. He has a passion for good wine and a deep history, while constantly being at the forefront of innovation. He embodies the joy of living and defended wine as a way of life – a way of life, thanks to the unifying character of wine. He has implemented organic and biodynamic farming practices in several vineyards, helping to protect and respect the previous environment that produces amazing wines around the world. It is Boisset’s love for history that drove him to discover and associate with some of the Napa Valley region’s most prestigious and legacy wineries, making them part of the prestigious Boisset Collection.

Boisset

Buy now on GrapeStars

From Raymond Vineyard and their five generations of winemakers to Buena Vista Winery, founded in 1857, Boisset has sought to build a stable of premium wines renowned for their history, while helping the practices of the institutes to help them improve and elevate the quality of their wine.

In 2015, Jean-Charles and Raymond Vineyards teamed up with Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony and Golden Globe award-winning singer, songwriter, humanitarian and philanthropist John Legend to create the exclusive LVE wine collection: Legend Vineyard, available on GrapeStars. .com and through the GrapeStars app.

JCB Grapestars

Buy now on GrapeStars

The Boisset Collection extends beyond high-end wineries to include other historic Napa Valley landmarks including the Oakville Grocery and Wine Merchant (the oldest continuously operating grocery store in California) as well as the 1881 Napa Valley Wine History Museum, where visitors can sample Napa Valley wines from the best producers while browsing the first collection of such relics in Napa Valley related to the wine trade, including antique decanters by Jean-Charles. 2022 will see the opening of the depot in Calistoga, founded in 1868 as California’s second station, the new vision that Jean-Charles infuses into the property will include a gourmet food store, a distilled spirits center, a brewery and a garden beer wagons, and six wagons with their own unique experiences, all rooted in the history of Calistoga founder Sam Brannan.

JCB

Buy now on GrapeStars

He and his wife Gina recently purchased Ink House, a luxury inn in Saint Helena that epitomizes their signature hospitality. If that’s not enough, he has also created homonymous collections for jewelry, perfumes and the JCB Passion collection by Baccarat – the first line of glassware that the historic French crystal company has ever made with a winemaker. Additionally, JCB offerings include home accessories that exemplify the JCB world of hospitality and entertainment. Jean-Charles has also created a collection of unique JCB tasting rooms and salons where customers can have the ultimate experience tasting his namesake wines in a luxurious setting.

JCB

JCB Tasting Room, Yountville, CA

Prizes and distinctions followed Jean-Charles throughout his illustrious career. In March 2008, he received the Meininger’s International Wine Entrepreneur of the Year award; and in December 2008, he was named “Innovator of the Year” by Wine Enthusiast. Haute Living named him to the Haute List San Francisco, recognizing the San Francisco Bay Area’s 100 Most Influential People. He received the 2014 Jefferson Prize from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, which celebrates the museum’s historic connection to wine.

Boisset

In 2015, Jean-Charles was named honorary co-chair of that year’s Sonoma Harvest wine auction, which broke all records raising $ 4.5 million. In March 2017, Jean-Charles and Gina received the Mondavi Food & Wine Award Robert Mondavi Wine & Food awarded by the Collins College of Hospitality Management in honor of their vision and leadership in advancing the wine industry . And in May 2019, Jean-Charles received the Wine Country Business of the Year French American Business Award from the Franco-American Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco.

boisset

It’s no wonder that GrapeStars takes the time to honor all that Jean-Charles has accomplished, while clinking glasses to his continued success in gaining recognition for Napa Valley wineries. Buy the JBC Collection now at GrapeStars.com.

Boisset

Jean-Jean Pelletier and Robert Pelletier from GrapeStars were proud to welcome Jean-Charles Boisset during Art Basel in Miami

GrapeStars, led by Jean-Jean and Robert, the two incredible forces behind this incredible innovation for the beverage world, stem from great human passion and ingenuity. They are unstoppable in their approach of reinvention, communication and creation where the dream is linked to reality and to tangible inventive products made by the most precious in the world! More to come because the creativity for them is limitless and I love their fabulous dynamism! Congratulations, GrapeStars !! – Jean-Charles Boisset


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Gilbreth Chronicle: Some Truisms About Wine and the Second Glass Test | Chroniclers https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/gilbreth-chronicle-some-truisms-about-wine-and-the-second-glass-test-chroniclers/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/gilbreth-chronicle-some-truisms-about-wine-and-the-second-glass-test-chroniclers/ The consumption of fine wines and spirits must be approached responsibly for two reasons: 1) Alcohol in general has caused a multitude of societal ills over the millennia, which must always be kept in mind; and (with this preface and on a much lighter note), 2) They can put a serious dent in the paperback. […]]]>

The consumption of fine wines and spirits must be approached responsibly for two reasons: 1) Alcohol in general has caused a multitude of societal ills over the millennia, which must always be kept in mind; and (with this preface and on a much lighter note), 2) They can put a serious dent in the paperback.

When I was in college (we’re talking about a millennium ago – the 1970s), you didn’t hear too much about expensive wines and spirits. It’s probably because none of us students really had any money, which tends to be a failure.

We were of course familiar with Dom Perignon champagne, which had achieved mythical status and reputation and was memorably priced at $ 100 a bottle (approx). But I don’t remember drinking it. (Dom Perignon’s prices haven’t kept up with inflation. So a $ 100 bottle in 1978 would cost around $ 400 nowadays. Instead, a quick online search shows that it can easily be bought for. less than half.)

Not to be confused with a true connoisseur, in the years after college I discovered some truisms. Whether or not they are true is a matter of opinion, but the first would be that American white wines are almost uniformly competitive around the world and attractively priced. Of course, one could insist on having a good French Chardonnay, but it will be much more expensive and, like most wines, will likely fail the second glass test. (An extreme example is that MD 20/20 tastes like just about anything after a drink or two.)

There are those who will insist that their Sauvignon Blanc comes from New Zealand or that their moderately sweet wine is German Riesling, which only proves a second truism: the wine snobbery is alive and well. This is as it should be, within reason of course. These same aficionados are the ones who will use colorful descriptive terms to imbue the emotional depths of how they feel about a glass of wine, whether it’s conveying a feeling of “dread” or bestowing a bouquet. with notes of “grass,” “animal”, “cherries”, “tobacco”, “humus”, “undergrowth” or even “bottled sex.” (At one point, we obviously question the impressions palate in relation to side effects.)

When it comes to red wine, it is true that some of the most beautiful wine regions in the world can be found in France. People are tired of hearing this and it has become a stereotype, but there is a reason why it has become a stereotype. The great premiers crus or premiers crus of Bordeaux (five in number: Haut-Brion, Lafite Rothschild, Mouton Rothschild, Latour and Margaux) have a history of superior quality which has attracted the attention not only of connoisseurs. , but investors.

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As a result, the prices for each are well outside the realm of affordability for the average consumer, starting at around $ 1,000 (round number) per bottle and going well beyond that, depending on the year. (Interestingly, Bordeaux reds are blended wines, which means they are made up of more than one type of grape.)

Again, many American reds are excellent and affordable, and Australians are very proud of their shiraz (sort of their version of French syrah), the Spaniards of their Riojas (another blended wine, tempranillo being the dominant grape variety), South Africans their Pinotage (cross between Pinot Noir and Cinsault), Argentines their Malbec, Italians their Barolo (made from the Nebbiolo grape) and so on, as it should be. All of them can be found at affordable prices, as can many exceptional French reds such as Côtes de Beaune or Côte de Nuits (both made mostly of Pinot Noir.)

Gilbreth Column: Johns Island's Rational Roads Group Offers Refreshing Alternatives

If the prices of French Premier Cru Bordeaux rouge seem outrageous, well, they are. It is a blended wine that varies considerably from year to year and yet the prices remain astronomical due to speculation. (Blend wines seem even more volatile in quality when it comes to Tuscan Chiantis. When ordering, you don’t know what to expect – or at least I certainly don’t.)

According to an article on Wikipedia, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti in France (generally abbreviated in DRC) produces two wines – in particular the Burgundy reds (pinot noir) – which are considered among the best. The article quotes a wine writer describing Romanée-Conti and La Tache as “masterpieces of balance” which “perfectly reflect the aroma and flavors of ripe fruit from old vines and the character of the wine. terroir ”.

Are you ready for this? The average price per bottle could set you back $ 21,326. All I can say is it would take a pretty big gut to avoid being poisoned by that prize – or at least a weirdly generous host.

Gilbreth Column: Soft music from the university recital;  bitter notes on the state of the city


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Culinary calendar December 1-8 – Winter market at the Pavilion, holiday pies and cooking classes https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/culinary-calendar-december-1-8-winter-market-at-the-pavilion-holiday-pies-and-cooking-classes/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 17:01:48 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/culinary-calendar-december-1-8-winter-market-at-the-pavilion-holiday-pies-and-cooking-classes/ Winter Market at the Pavilion – Do your holiday shopping with a variety of local farmers, food vendors, processors, artisans and artisans. Wednesdays, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. until December 22. Riverfront Park, Pavilion, 507 N. Howard St. (509) 625-6601. Order Holiday Pies and Buns – Artisanal Fruit Pies from Sunset Orchards in Green […]]]>

Winter Market at the Pavilion – Do your holiday shopping with a variety of local farmers, food vendors, processors, artisans and artisans. Wednesdays, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. until December 22. Riverfront Park, Pavilion, 507 N. Howard St. (509) 625-6601.

Order Holiday Pies and Buns – Artisanal Fruit Pies from Sunset Orchards in Green Bluff. Flavors include peach, peach bilberry, apple, caramel apple, cherry, pumpkin, pecan, and chocolate pecan. Rolled buns available by the dozen in original flavor, cranberry orange and garlic parmesan. The cinnamon rolls come in six packs for Christmas morning. Learn more at blissfulwhisk.com. Available on a first come, first serve basis until December 24, 7:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Blissful Whisk, 1612 N. Barker Road, Suite 101, Spokane Valley. (509) 242-3189.

Chefs Shuck With Us – A weekly fundraiser hosted by Chef Chad White featuring chef collaborations to create new oyster creations accompanied by a cocktail. Ten percent of the proceeds go to Stand Up to Cancer. Each ticket includes five raffle tickets, a shot and a beer, a free photo booth and a Chefs Shuck With Us sticker. Visit facebook.com/zonablancacevichebar to see the full schedule of guest chefs. Wednesdays, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. until February 23. Zona Blanca, 154 S. Madison St. $ 25. (509) 443-5427.

Cooking Class: Thai Evening with Chef Lesa – Learn how to make Thai yellow coconut curry with squash and vegetables served over jasmine rice; pad kee mao, or drunken noodles, with vegetables, pork and spicy sauce; and crunchy Thai salad with cabbage, fresh vegetables, pulled chicken and peanut dressing. Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Culinary Stone, 2129 Main Street, Coeur d’Alene. $ 50. (208) 277-4116.

French Cooking Class – Learn how to make a Niçoise salad of duck breast, coq au vin, tomato pies and macaroons. Wednesday, 5:30 p.m. Wanderlust Delicato, 421 W. Main Ave. $ 85. (509) 822-7087.

Sparkling Evening on the River – Taste 24 champagnes and appetizers while chatting with local wine experts. Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Ruby River Hotel, 700 N. Division St. $ 65. (509) 326-5577.

European Outdoor Christmas Market – With antique and vintage items, homemade crafts and gifts, European food trucks, spicy mulled wine and cider, hot chocolate, live music and an appearance by the Santa Claus. Inspired by Christkindlmarkts in Germany, Austria and other European countries during the Advent season. Friday 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Buy your tickets at visitnorthidaho.com. McIntire Family Park, 9830 N. Government Way, Hayden. $ 7 for two days; $ 5 Friday only.

Fireside Concert Series – Live music with table service from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Mediterranean-inspired menu was created by chefs Chad White and Caleb Smith. Wine and beer are available. Reservations recommended as walk-in availability is limited. Friday: Michael Vallée. Saturday: Carli Osika. December 10: Craig Catlett. Arbor Crest Tasting Room, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Road. (509) 747-3903.

Cooking class: Christmas dinner with chef Patricia – Learn how to make snails and its parsley butter, baked snails with garlic and parsley butter, served with a salad of red cabbage with dried fruits and smoked salmon. For the main course, prepare a duck confit and mashed sweet potato gratin flavored with spices and garnished with walnuts, served with a salad seasoned with a walnut vinaigrette. For dessert, make samosas and fill the filo pastry with a compote of dried apricot, pear and apple flavored with citrus and cinnamon. Friday, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Culinary Stone, 2129 Main Street, Coeur d’Alene. $ 50. (208) 277-4116.

Rocket Market Wine Class – A weekly wine class hosted by Kevin Murphy of Rocket Market. Each week offers a new theme with wines to taste and snacks to pair. Call or visit rocketmarket.com to register. Friday, 6:30 p.m. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (509) 343-2253.

Cucina di Roma (sold out) – Learn how to make carbonara, artichoke salad, pork saltimbocca, and summer berry sabayon. Saturday, 5 p.m. Wanderlust Delicato, 421 W. Main Ave. $ 65. (509) 822-7087.

Wine Class: Joy And Bliss Melt Snow – Taste full, rich and bold wines, perfect for tasting in increasingly cold weather. Sunday, 2-3 a.m. The Culinary Stone, 2129 Main Street, Coeur d’Alene. $ 15. (208) 277-4116.

Holiday Cocktail Class with Mixologist Renée – Chef Renée will share the history of England’s classic drinks and perfect holiday recipes with step-by-step instructions. The course includes an aperitif, a cocktail recipe booklet and three drinks. MondayDec. December 6 and 9 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The Culinary Stone, 2129 Main Street, Coeur d’Alene. $ 50. (208) 277-4116.


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Festive drinks are rare. But fear not, SUDI PIGOTT is tracking wine exchanges https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/festive-drinks-are-rare-but-fear-not-sudi-pigott-is-tracking-wine-exchanges/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 23:19:20 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/festive-drinks-are-rare-but-fear-not-sudi-pigott-is-tracking-wine-exchanges/ This year, more than any other, we look forward to the festivities. So, hearing our favorite Christmas drinks can run out, due to a shortage of truck drivers and supply chain issues, this is the breaking news we need. It might be difficult to stock up on party items like champagne, New Zealand sauvignon blanc, […]]]>

This year, more than any other, we look forward to the festivities. So, hearing our favorite Christmas drinks can run out, due to a shortage of truck drivers and supply chain issues, this is the breaking news we need.

It might be difficult to stock up on party items like champagne, New Zealand sauvignon blanc, and California zinfandel. Owners of brands such as Laurent Perrier and Moet & Chandon are so worried that 49 bosses in the beverage industry have written to Transportation Secretary Grant Shapps asking him to step up efforts to resolve the issue.

Your best bet is, without a doubt, to take preventative measures by taking an adventurous approach and ditching your old favorites for alternatives that taste just as good, cost the same or less – and will surprise your guests to boot!

From Lebanese reds to Japanese fizz, here’s our guide to the most elegant trades for the holiday season.

GO TO THE FAR EAST FOR THE NEW FAVORITE FIZZ

Sudi Pigott speaks out on a selection of alternatives for taking preventative measures, as there is a risk that our favorite Christmas drinks will run out. Pictured: Morrisons, the best sparkling English brut

The champagne harvests have been affected by inclement weather – they are down by around 30% – so shortages caused by transportation issues this Christmas may well be the forerunner of limited production next year as well. In other words, there’s never been a better time to find a new favorite fizz. Pop the caps with a bottle of this product. . .

Morrisons The Best Sparkling English Brut, £ 25, Morrisons

A surprisingly good English vintage sparkling wine, aged for eight years, which rivals anything the Champenois can produce. It has complex brioche aromas on the nose and an appropriate depth of flavor with the signature citrus, green apple.5/5

Atago No Matsu ‘Waiting Love’ Sparkling Sake, £ 15.99, totneswine.com

Sudi said Atago No Matsu Waiting Love¿ Sparkling Sake (pictured) matches the clean, fine bubbles in champagne

Sudi said Atago No Matsu ‘Waiting Love’ Sparkling Sake (pictured) matches the clean, fine bubbles in champagne

Sparkling sake is dangerously drinkable. It matches the clean and fine bubbles of champagne thanks to a second fermentation in the bottle. Taste-wise, it has a whisper of sweetness, but nothing of the cloying brassy of many proseccos. Goes well with salty and sweet. 4.5 / 5

BAC BOURGOGNE DRILLING

A good Chardonnay such as a white Burgundy is synonymous with quality and a mainstay for entertaining, especially for the richest Christmas dishes.

In addition to transport and tariff issues, the Burgundy vineyard has also suffered from bad weather, which means it’s time to raise a glass to another region.

Those who like a medium to full bodied white with a nice mineral finish will love it. . .

Journey’s End Winemaker’s Reserve Chardonnay 2021 Stellenbosch South Africa, £ 8.99, Marks & Spencer

Sudi said Journey’s End Winemaker’s Reserve Chardonnay 2021 Stellenbosch South Africa (pictured) is deeply aromatic

Deeply aromatic with notes of grapefruit and peach leaf and a round mineral finish, rich in almonds. This South African Chardonnay has been aged for eight months in French oak barrels, giving it additional resonance. 4/5

Specially selected Côtes du Jura, £ 7.99, Aldi

Sudi said that Specially Selected Cotes du Jura (pictured) is an elegant drink, with intense aromas of peach and apricot

Sudi said that Specially Selected Cotes du Jura (pictured) is an elegant drink, with intense aromas of peach and apricot

Composed of 100% Chardonnay, this elegant beverage – originating in the French mountainous region east of Burgundy, which has been less affected by bad weather – is rich and elegant, with intense aromas of peach and apricot. complemented by nutty and mineral notes. It goes very well with fish, chicken or turkey. 3/5

CHUCK OUT THE CLOUDY BAY

Among your guests, there will always be fans of the fresh New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc crisp like fresh snow with its generous amounts of citrus. Still, transportation issues aside, Cloudy Bay has become somewhat outdated and expensive. Dare to be different this year. . .

Broadbent Vinho Verde NV, £ 12.99, 9elmswines.co.uk

Sudi said Broadbent Vinho Verde NV (pictured) tastes mellow with green apple and a touch of lychee and melon zest

Sudi said Broadbent Vinho Verde NV (pictured) tastes mellow with green apple and a touch of lychee and melon zest

The best Portuguese Vinho Verde can be refreshing and tangy with lots of orchard fruit – and it’s really quite special. Bright yellow in color, it reveals notes of currant, passion fruit, melon and a note of honeysuckle on the nose. To the taste, it is round and mellow with green apple and a touch of lychee and melon zest, as well as a lot of finesse and a sweet effervescence. It will surprise your guests with its refinement. 4/5

Classics No.30 Gruner Veltliner Weingut Rabi, £ 8.50, Marks & Spencer

Sudi said Classics No. 30 Gruner Veltliner Weingut Rabi (pictured) pairs well with seafood

Sudi said Classics No. 30 Gruner Veltliner Weingut Rabi (pictured) pairs well with seafood

Austria’s first white grape is a good change from Sauvignon Blanc, offering a little more spice. There are fresh citrus and white pepper notes, with superb citrus and orchard fruit flavors and a racy mineral hint. It pairs well with seafood – so stock up on a bottle or two for the smoked salmon. 4.5 / 5

RISE A GLASS OF ROMANIAN RED

Wine lovers often look for powerful, medium-bodied reds like California Zinfandel, which has lots of jammy red fruit flavors.

However, Zinfandel fans may need to find alternatives as weather and transport factors could make the supply unstable. Instead, take one of the new kids in the neighborhood. . .

Romanian Pinot Noir blueprint, £ 5.99, Waitrose

Sudi said the Romanian Blueprint Pinot Noir (pictured) is an elegant offering, full of juicy red berry characteristics

Sudi said the Romanian Blueprint Pinot Noir (pictured) is an elegant offering, full of juicy red berry characteristics

Romanian wines are getting a lot of excitement right now, and this elegant offer comes at a very nice price as well. Full of juicy red fruit characteristics, it has a hint of flavorful complexity and tannic bite, with hints of cherry and raspberry on the palate, and a sweet smoothness on the finish. A crowd pleaser with turkey or goose and a good match for Stilton. 3/5

Specially selected Lebanese red, £ 7.99, Aldi

Sudi said the specially selected Lebanese red (pictured) has aromas of blackberry, cassis and black cherry

Sudi said the specially selected Lebanese red (pictured) has aromas of blackberry, cassis and black cherry

Deep purple with aromas of blackberry, cassis and black cherry, this inexpensive Aldi wine – a surprise hit for the supermarket – would hold up well on a prime rib. 3.5 / 5

GO GREEK FOR A GLASS OF PRESTIGE

A rich, ripe Bordeaux Cabernet Sauvignon is an expensive treat, and is synonymous with Christmas roasts and cheeses. But there are many non-Gallic alternatives to this prestige casting that might prove to be easier to find.

Kokotos Estate Cabernet Sauvignon-Merlot de Stamata, Attiki 2017, £ 27, maltbyandgreek.com

Sudi said Stamata's Kokotos Estate Cabernet Sauvignon-Merlot, Attiki 2017 (pictured) is a complex bouquet of red fruits

Sudi said Stamata’s Kokotos Estate Cabernet Sauvignon-Merlot, Attiki 2017 (pictured) is a complex bouquet of red fruits

A real find with its intense and deep ruby ​​color and its complex bouquet of red fruits, prunes, spices and tobacco, it has a robust taste with a fruity aftertaste of dark chocolate. Will do more than hold up with the cheese board. 4/5

Found Pais, Chili, £ 9, Marks & Spencer

Made from the rediscovered Pais grape from Chile’s southern Itata Valley, this bright and easy-drinking red, with aromas of black cherry and a hint of anise, is medium-bodied with lightly cooked plums on the palate and a heavy undertow. ‘spices. It has a smooth finish that packs a punch and would be perfect with any festive toppings. Enjoy! 3/5

Sudi said Found Pais, Chile (pictured) is a bright, easy-drinking red, with aromas of black cherry and a hint of anise

Sudi said Found Pais, Chile (pictured) is a bright, easy-drinking red, with aromas of black cherry and a hint of anise


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Russia craves a prestigious brand on the world’s wine list https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/russia-craves-a-prestigious-brand-on-the-worlds-wine-list/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 10:01:03 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/russia-craves-a-prestigious-brand-on-the-worlds-wine-list/ MOSCOW – One year after its opening, Russian wine is always full. Located in the center of Moscow, it has become a trendy restaurant. Its wine list stands out: it offers only Russian brands, more than 200, marked in different colors in all regions of the south of the country. Russian wine (in English on […]]]>

MOSCOW – One year after its opening, Russian wine is always full. Located in the center of Moscow, it has become a trendy restaurant. Its wine list stands out: it offers only Russian brands, more than 200, marked in different colors in all regions of the south of the country.

Russian wine (in English on the storefront, as well as the eclectic menu) unsurprisingly includes Crimea, the Ukrainian peninsula where viticulture has come back to life since Moscow annexed it in 2014.


“But let’s not talk about politics! Wine is pleasure,” says restaurant owner Artur Sarkisian, recommending a Riesling from Gunko or a Muscat from Gaï Kodzor, two benchmark labels from Krasnodar Krai.

From Greek plantations to the uprooting of Gorbachev

In this region of southwestern Russia near the Black Sea, where half of the national production comes from, legend has it that the Greeks planted the first vines. Thirty-five years after the “dry law” of Mikhail Gorbachev who imposed the uprooting of vines and devastated this territory in an attempt to fight against alcoholism, French chardonnay and sauvignon blanc vines rub shoulders with local grape varieties such as amazing Krasnostop.

“Made in Russia” has nothing to do with post-Soviet methods and red wines with strong coloring. “Under the USSR, it was quantity above all, with wines that were too sweet. We now know how to make good dry wines and the quality is constantly improving,” explains Sarkisian.

He knows what he is talking about. It publishes a guide to Russian wines. In eight years, the book has grown from 55 wines to 500. The first edition is printed in 1,000 copies, the last in 13,000. “The demand for Russian wine continues to increase among the Russians. There is of course a dose of patriotism. But also of curiosity, ”he says.

With COVID-19 and the difficulties of traveling abroad, many have come to the southern regions to experience local productions. Wine tourism is booming. At the same time, in Moscow, tasting clubs are multiplying. “The mentality is changing, including among our distributors who, for a long time, thought that only imported wines were of good quality,” explains Elena Porman, coordinator of the “New Russian Wine” program.

Boost in the Kremlin

The Kremlin gave a boost, especially as many oligarchs and senior officials from the political elite began to invest in the vineyards. “The government is helping producers. Financial grants cover planting costs. But there is also a new law which has allowed better control of the sector, ”explains Porman.

By sorting out the regulations, the production of bulk wine, for example, has been banned. One of the victims is the French company Castel, which bottled imported wines on site.

It was an amendment to this law that sparked a champagne war last summer. The new regulations concern labeling, requiring the words “sparkling wine” on the back label, behind the bottle, and reserving for Russian producers the right to display “champagne” on the front. Quite paradoxical for French Champagne producers, who want to preserve their appellation.

The “champagne” war

In protest, French producers temporarily halted sales to Russia. But as Christmas approaches, financial considerations have taken over. Exports have resumed since September 15. The Champagne industry sells around 1.5 million bottles per year in Russia. A very small bubble in a country which has always produced “russkoe champanskoe” and other sparkling wines. Among the major brands: Abrau-Durso with 40 million bottles per year from a magnificent site on the heights of a lake.

Another beneficiary is the Crimea and its ancestral producers who, since annexation, have experienced a renaissance, thanks to the total opening up to the Russian market. Coincidentally (or not), one of the main brands is owned by someone close to President Vladimir Putin.

Profitability will take a long time to come

“Russian champagne, of course, is not real French champagne. But we are making progress,” said Vladimir Gunko. This tall guy speaks from experience. Around it, some 20 hectares of land are spread out in a beautiful hidden corner of the Krasnodar Krai region.

For this mechanical engineer, wine was a passion that turned into a real business, with some 50,000 bottles per year – 100,000 by 2024, according to his business plan. Gunko is starting a champagne business and expects its first production next year. For now, it’s wine. He is “terroir», He insists, happy to offer Malbec from his cellar. He has given himself the means: he has invested some 3 million euros and knows how to be patient. “Profitability will be long in coming,” he smiles in the middle of his vineyards.

Caps and vats: everything is imported

In Gunko, like everywhere else in the Krasnodar Krai, everything is imported, from vines to corks, including reservoirs and filtration equipment. European producers and Russian intermediaries also manage to bring Western equipment indirectly into Crimea, despite the sanctions prohibiting such imports.

All machines come from France, Italy or Germany. In the wine industry, Russia is thus caught up by its insufficient industrial diversification, far from raw materials, and by the weaknesses of the network of its small and medium-sized enterprises. So, for wines, production costs and prices are high in Moscow stores.

“If Russian viticulture is reborn, the upstream sector remains in decline,” notes Frank Duseigneur, one of the many French professionals who have settled and have ambitions on these lands of the Krasnodar Krai. He watches over the Château de Talu vineyard, one million bottles per year with 100 hectares of production and, each year, 15 hectares of new plantations. After a museum, a restaurant and a tasting room, it is planned to build a hotel and a spa, as wine tourism is developing rapidly in the region.

Putin’s Palace and Talu Castle

Gelendzhik is a seaside resort that has gained international fame since Kremlin opponent Alexei Navalny published a video in January on Vladimir Putin’s palace: a huge real estate estate lined with a vast field of vines.

From the grounds of Talu Castle, you can imagine this Putin Palace further down the coast. “We are by the sea but hidden by the mountains. A unique place for wine, ”says Duseigneur, who, in the midst of the Merlot harvest, talks first and foremost about business. “Another problem: there is not enough training. Russia needs to improve the quality of its workforce. When they prune the vines here, it’s 250 plants per day compared to 1,000 in France. nobody, against a ton in France ”, specifies the agricultural engineer.

When we arrived the only advantage was that the earth rested for 15 years

In Russia, with 90,000 hectares of vines (far behind 750,000 in France), the density is also lower than in France: 1,000 to 4,000 vines per hectare, against 5,000 to 8,000 in France. Barely 20 years ago, no one had grasped the potential of this region. In Moscow, it was almost impossible to find a single quality Russian wine, ”recalls Renaud Burnier. Together with his Russian wife, Burnier, who is Swiss, founded a winery in Krasnodar Krai which is today a model.

“When we arrived, the vines were abandoned, the equipment dilapidated, the population discouraged. The only advantage was that the land had rested for 15 years.” Its priority: gourmet wines, without fertilizers or insecticides. “Our wine has the taste of the Russian soil but Swiss rigor and attention to detail!” jokes Burnier, whose 50 hectare estate near the seaside town of Anapa produces 200,000 bottles a year. “Today, we are no longer the only ones.”

Drink less and better

This boom in “made in Russia” wines takes place in a context of changing consumption habits. Especially among the middle class, in big cities, Russians drink less and differently. Less vodka and less bad wines. More beer and good wine. Each Russian over the age of 15 consumes an average of 11.1 liters of pure alcohol per year, which is less than the French (11.7 liters).

Unlike the French who drink only French wine, the Russians are like the English

Fighting against alcoholism, the government managed to reduce this consumption by 43% per individual between 2003 and 2016 thanks to voluntary restriction measures, in particular on advertising and sales. Russia is going through a serious demographic crisis and fighting alcoholism means increasing life expectancy. The authorities have understood this. Society too.

“Priority to quality over quantity. A kind of maturity”, explains Natalia Vremea, renowned oenologist in Moscow. “More and more Russians are looking for authentic wines, interesting grape varieties, natural terroirs. Unlike the French who drink only French wine, the Russians are like the English. They are curious about wines from all over the world and now their own wines. In return, this is good news for French exporters: Russia is becoming more and more fond of wine and, eventually, will inevitably buy more French wines. “Especially since Russia does not yet produce great wines. wines.

For now, some even hope that Russia will export. And not just the mediocre table wines sold in large quantities to China. “The share of Russian wine on our shelves is increasing, as well as the number of stores. A boom that is proportional to the boom in production. Exports should follow, ”hopes Sandro Khatiashvili, one of the purchasing managers of Simple Wine, a growing store network. “We have launched a program to promote the best Russian wines and intensify their distribution. For this seller in Moscow as for the Krasnodar Krai vineyards, there is no doubt: Russia will find its place on the new wine list of the world.

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Meet the curious and daring Jean-Charles Boisset, CEO of the luxury wine and spirits group Napa Valley https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/meet-the-curious-and-daring-jean-charles-boisset-ceo-of-the-luxury-wine-and-spirits-group-napa-valley/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 16:16:34 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/meet-the-curious-and-daring-jean-charles-boisset-ceo-of-the-luxury-wine-and-spirits-group-napa-valley/ You said earlier that you thought the business could be better without you. Why? Well, because we’re constantly made up of more people, and because maybe I’ll get, you know, probably overwhelmed. I will become obsolete, I will not become as trendy as I am today. I will not follow the evolution of time. We […]]]>

You said earlier that you thought the business could be better without you. Why?

Well, because we’re constantly made up of more people, and because maybe I’ll get, you know, probably overwhelmed. I will become obsolete, I will not become as trendy as I am today. I will not follow the evolution of time.

We have an amazing team that will be ready to take it to the next level whether I’m there or not. A lot of things that are happening today are happening without me being involved in the smallest details. I structure it as such. I get excited when I see people shine without my being involved every step of the way, when they take calculated but inspiring risks themselves and they go for it.

I believe we have to stop having ego as big as the world to say it’s going to crumble without me. We are a collection of amazing wineries, amazing brands that are way beyond my time. Listen, we resurrected Buena Vista Winery; the cellar is better than it has ever been. Raymond… is four times his size. The Ink House, this beautiful hotel we bought, is more spectacular than ever.

If I am an inspiring, passionate, and energetic dreamer, this is exactly who I think I should be. President, CEO, leader, these are all big words that don’t belong to me, but to an MBA school that I don’t even belong to.

What is your opinion on the future of the US economy?

I am exactly bullish. I think America is the best place to be. American democracy is the best of all; the system of brakes and counterweights. And the presidential system is fabulous. I think the world should manage its economies the same way America does.

What are you doing to attract employees?

What we hope to attract is the engagement of their opinion, the engagement of their contribution, that what they say means something and we act according to their belief. We hope to attract enthusiasm and energy, we hope to attract passion and dreams.

Do you think salaries are the answer to recruiting?

Absolutely not. Our agenda is long term and we choose to give people a voice and a voice where people can make a difference.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being located in North Bay?

We must continue to embrace this spirit of action, to support our entrepreneurs and to encourage creative enterprises. We need to make sure that North Bay has thriving communities with housing that people can afford; we need our local governments to work in partnership with businesses that seek to make it a better place, where sometimes we feel more engaged than supported by them.

If you could change a government regulation, what would it be?

In some wine regions of northern California, the connection to food and wine is sorely missed. Many places suggest that a winery should not offer dishes to pair with wines. We believe this needs to evolve because wine and food are better together, and the enjoyment of wine should never be drinking, alone, but rather the cultural experience of wine and food together.

What other acquisitions are you considering?

And we have big ambitions. We keep adding, and we keep bringing more to our culture, more phenomenal and visionary ideas that make us a better place than yesterday. Our journey is not over.

Do you want to share with NBBJ readers what these acquisitions will be?

No, because I want you to call me every week because we are going to feed you with new ideas.

What do you see in the boutique hospitality industry?

Huge potential as people change their travel habits. We chose to want to be in smaller houses, extended houses, to be received and to live like the owners of the houses. This is why the house my wife and I bought, this beautiful house in Napa Valley, so you can rent multiple rooms, all the rooms in the hotel and hang out with your friends at a private chef or you – even cook in the kitchen and live like a Victorian home owner in the heart of St. Helena on Highway 29.

I think people want unique experiences, they want to be part of the landscape, the fabric and the experience of the wine country, the beach, the mountains or nature. Today, it’s all about experience, much more than transaction.

How is your wife, Gina Gallo, involved in the Boisset Collection?

Gina is my muse and a source of creative energy. We love to mix wine, discuss wine and share the life of wine, but our company remains entirely separate as it has a very successful career in the wine world with its family winery.

Do you think your twins will ever be involved in the wine industry?

We would love it of course. But they will find their way to their wine world in their own way, just like their mother and I did.

What advice would you give to someone starting their career in your industry?

Be curious, be bold. Try everything and meet as many people as you can. The world of wine is an inspiring world that rewards enthusiasts and committed people. Wine is never a job, it’s a life. Kiss him.


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Lush Lounge bar opens at the old Vine & Barley in downtown Stuart https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/lush-lounge-bar-opens-at-the-old-vine-barley-in-downtown-stuart/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 11:05:38 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/lush-lounge-bar-opens-at-the-old-vine-barley-in-downtown-stuart/ Amanda Bussett and Janelle Bremer have always wanted to go into business together. Best friends met 15 years ago while on a study abroad program in Italy. Bussett, 35, from Connecticut, started as a bartender at 2nd Street Bistro in downtown Fort Pierce and started his own online marketing business. Bremer, 34, from upstate New […]]]>

Amanda Bussett and Janelle Bremer have always wanted to go into business together.

Best friends met 15 years ago while on a study abroad program in Italy.

Bussett, 35, from Connecticut, started as a bartender at 2nd Street Bistro in downtown Fort Pierce and started his own online marketing business. Bremer, 34, from upstate New York, moved to the Treasure Coast in June from Hawaii, where she still has a food delivery service.

“I’ve always loved being a bartender,” Bussett said. “I wish there wasn’t such a negative connotation about it. I like the fast-paced environment. I like to entertain people.

Departure from the city center:Rising rents force Vine & Barley to close

Wine and beer trail:Discover 12 breweries, as well as a wine estate, a cider house and a mead

Food trucks are flourishing: 2 things that helped them in the midst of COVID-19

Co-owner Amanda Bussett speaks to guests at the Lush Lounge in downtown Stuart on Wednesday, November 17, 2021. “It's a vibe.  People come to thank us for bringing West Palm to Stuart, ”Bussett said.  The Lush Lounge opened on November 4, 2021 and serves wine, craft beer, selected cocktails and cold cuts.

In August, Bremer was on a date at Vine & Barley in downtown Stuart when she learned it was closing in a few weeks. The friends made a business plan, sent it to the owner, and signed a lease two weeks later for the Lush Lounge.

“The way it all happened, it’s so meant to be,” Bussett said. “Even though it was a lot of work, it went well.



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Wine and dine like a king https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wine-and-dine-like-a-king/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 21:10:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wine-and-dine-like-a-king/ FRENCH CUISINE An assortment of pâtés prepared by chef Cyrille Soenen (right) can be enjoyed at Wine Drop, a new wine tasting space in San Juan, or in the comfort of your own home, with a bottle or two of your favorite AWC wines. – CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS Today there is a big celebration called the […]]]>

FRENCH CUISINE An assortment of pâtés prepared by chef Cyrille Soenen (right) can be enjoyed at Wine Drop, a new wine tasting space in San Juan, or in the comfort of your own home, with a bottle or two of your favorite AWC wines. – CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Today there is a big celebration called the Feast of Christ the King, so I asked myself: what meal would suit a king?

The cuisine of French chef Cyrille Soenen, who has been recognized as one of the Maîtres Cuisiniers de France or Master Cuisinier de France, is the highest honor a chef can achieve. My favorite haunt – a lifetime ago, it seems – was Cicou, a French bistro in San Juan owned and run by Chef Cyrille with his wife Anna Soenen. Cicou has since closed but here’s the good news: you can now enjoy Chef Cyrille’s cuisine not just one or two but three ways!

Drop of wine

The first is at the recently opened Wine Drop, the latest creation from another Frenchman, wine connoisseur Jean Philippe Guillot from AWC Philippines. It is a wine tasting space in San Juan where you can taste good wine with Chef Cyrille’s appetizers like pâté en croûte, pork rillettes, country pâté, pork head pâté and the parmesan flan.

The wines here are direct imports from different parts of the world. Besides French wines, they also have wines from Argentina, Italy, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and the United States. Wine Drop is actually a retail store with their collection of wines. They also offer craft spirits, local craft beer, Belgian beer as well as gift items for wine lovers such as corkscrews, wine glasses and decanters.

But they have also integrated a tasting table and a bar that can accommodate around 12 people. Seems like a great option for a safe barkada reunion! Jean Philippe explains: “It is important for us to have a comfortable and safe place where humans can taste wine in a chic and exclusive environment.

Wine Drop also offers items from Txanton, famous for its well-prepared Spanish specialties. Thus, you will be able to taste your wine with good ham, apart from the French pâtés and rilettes of Chef Cyrille.

The best news, however, is that you don’t even have to go to the store. You can choose to have the wines and food delivered to your home. Or you can even have them sent as gifts. Wine Drop offers pretty gift boxes for one, three or six bottles; or if you just want to offer someone two more bottles of the ham and pate, they can organize that for you as well. “We are flexible,” says Jean Philippe. They can also accommodate multiple deliveries if you want to send gifts this Christmas season. (Call Wine Drop at 0956-1887548 or 8671-9125 for inquiries and orders. Visit winedrop.life for a full product list.)

Here at Home

The second way to get your hands on Chef Cyrille’s king-size dishes is through his own takeout setup, endearingly called CiÇou à la Maison. He cooks in his family kitchen and you just have to order. (Call CiÇou for inquiries 0917-5401811).

Here you can order bigger dishes like whole roasted chicken for six to eight people or a whole roasted turkey for 10 to 15 people or a whole lechon de leche stuffed with kielbasa sausage and mushrooms.

It also offers classic French dishes such as foie gras terrine and cassoulet. These are vacuum packed so you can order them now and have them ready in time for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

You can also order croissants and baguettes, perfected like a real French master chef would. You can also order his famous kouign amann, the French puff pastry made extremely addictive by butter. There is the classic version, but now it also makes kouignettes or smaller versions with a variety of flavors like chocolate chips and cinnamon. There are also savory versions like a bacon kouign amann. The most interesting, even if it is not yet on the menu but has been a success in Bacolod where his wife is from, is a kouign amann inasal: a tasty version with inasal chicken on top!

Personal chef

Finally, if you really want to live an authentic French experience at home, Chef Cyrille can be your personal chef for your family reunion or event! Remember he was the executive chef of Intercon, so if you want your family to enjoy Angus prime rib with Yorkshire pudding like you remember in Prince Albert, give him a call. (Cicou at the House 0917-5401811).

I had the privilege and pleasure of dining at the Soenen family home in Mussidan, France, and it was truly one of the best meals of my life. So cool that we can now experience the genius of this chef in our own homes too! You will truly feel like a king!

Here’s a really special Thanksgiving this Thursday. May your gatherings be abundant in food and love. Happy feast of Christ the King and happy thanksgiving!

Drop of wine. 2 / F Unit 5 One Kennedy Place, Club Filipino Ave cor. Ortigas Avenue, Greenhills, City of San Juan.

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500 years after the Inquisition, the kosher wine industry in Spain takes off https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/500-years-after-the-inquisition-the-kosher-wine-industry-in-spain-takes-off/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 05:20:16 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/500-years-after-the-inquisition-the-kosher-wine-industry-in-spain-takes-off/ MADRID (JTA) – Located in the Priorat region of Spain, hidden in the steep hills and lush mountains of the province of Tarragona, 160 km southwest of Barcelona, ​​is the Celler de Capçanes winery. The cooperative cellar, founded in 1933, has continued to grow over the decades its reputation for top-of-the-range vintages. And in 1995, […]]]>

MADRID (JTA) – Located in the Priorat region of Spain, hidden in the steep hills and lush mountains of the province of Tarragona, 160 km southwest of Barcelona, ​​is the Celler de Capçanes winery.

The cooperative cellar, founded in 1933, has continued to grow over the decades its reputation for top-of-the-range vintages. And in 1995, he was approached with an unusual request: A Jewish family in Barcelona looking for wine of national origin asked if the winery would be willing to make one of Spain’s first kosher wines in hundreds of years. ‘years.

Jews played an important role in wine production on Spanish speaking lands for centuries – until they were expelled under the Inquisition of 1492. Despite the fact that the country, which has the largest wine region of the world, has tried to cultivate its Jewish community in recent years. decades, local Jews lacked a vibrant selection of locally produced kosher wines for, well, centuries.

But in recent years, a growing number of Jewish and non-Jewish winemakers have entered the Spanish kosher market, revitalizing the long-lost kosher wine line from La Rioja to Catalonia to Ribera del Duero, Castilla-La Mancha and Andalusia.

Simultaneously, public and private institutions such as the Network of Spanish Jewish Quarters and the Federation of Jewish Communities in Spain have launched a “Sephardic Vineyards” initiative to encourage the trend.

The decision to say yes in 1995 turned out to be commercially sound for Celler de Capçanes. It now sells its kosher wine worldwide from its base in the province of Tarragona, which many include in the lists of premium wine producing regions around the world.

“There are no Jews in the village, yet the Catholic members of the cooperative have invested their own funds to develop kosher wine,” said Jürgen Wagner, non-Jewish oenologist and export manager at Celler de Capçanes. “And we treat it with the handcrafted nature of a millennial tradition, designed as it was hundreds of years ago, but with the care and knowledge of today.”

The winery’s decision to make kosher wine – which now accounts for around 5% of its total production – has allowed it to restructure and modernize. Today it incorporates technology that allows it to select, separate and vinify small amounts of fruit according to strict ‘Lo Mevushal’ kosher standards, which means it is only handled by Jewish workers and has not been pasteurized.

Celler de Capçanes’ flagship kosher product – the Primavera flower, or spring flower – has helped put it on the international kosher scene. The wine is made from three grape varieties – 35% cabernet sauvignon, 35% garnatxa negra and 30% samsó – and matured for 12 months in new and one-year kosher French oak barrels. The full-bodied red is very dark in color, with notes of black cherry and chocolate and a flowery scent.

A Jewish employee works in the vineyard of the Celler de Capçanes winery in Monsant, Spain. (Courtesy of Celler de Capçanes / via JTA)

“For us, kosher wine has been the key to the evolution of the winery,” said Wagner.

In Tarragona, the estate’s small vines are planted on steep slopes, impossible to reach with machines. The wines of the small region have two appellations of origin from its two main wineries: the Origine Montsant and the Origine Priorat. It has become the heart of Spain’s new wave of kosher winemakers.

There is also the Cave Clos Mesorah Estate, designed by Moisés Cohen, agricultural engineer from Casablanca, and Anne Aletá, historian and sommelier from Toulouse, who are both business and life partners. In 1996, the couple bought an old vineyard in Priorat in order to bring it back to life, kosher style.

Unbeknownst to them, they were probably the first Sephardic Jewish family to own wine land in Spain for over 500 years – possibly millennia, as Jews were not allowed to own or buy land in medieval Spain.

It wasn’t until 2003, when they launched Elvi Wines on the estate, for the entrepreneurial duo to go from wine experts to non-kosher winegrowers. But nowadays their wines are made in six distinct regions of Spain – La Mancha, Rioja, Alella, Cava, Priorat and Montsant – and can be found in more than 25 countries, including on the menus of several Michelin-starred restaurants. .

The family business uses a philosophy of organic and spiritual agriculture.

“We are all deeply immersed in the kosher world. It’s our way of approaching and understanding wine, ”said Aletá, who is now CEO of Elvi Wines. “We are very tradition-driven. For us, we believe in the rhythm of nature and the Jewish calendar. Each month we follow the lunar cycle. We are committed to biodynamics and ecology.

Moisés and Anne’s signature product is Clos Mesorah, a very rich and fruity red wine from Montsant that often ranks among the best in international kosher wine rankings. The eye-catching label of the wine features a line from the “Song of Songs” (“Shir Hashirim”) – one of the five meguilots, or scrolls, of the Tanakh – commonly associated with sexuality and marriage rituals in Judaism. The verse on the label changes from year to year.

For all of these kosher growers, the fruit is typically hand picked, without the addition of yeast, filtration, colorings, mechanical handling, or chemical additives.

Barrels of vintage Elvi Wines’ Clos Menorah sit in the cellar in Priorat, Spain. (Courtesy of Elvi Wines / via JTA)

The production is overseen by certifiers from the Orthodox Union in the United States, the Kashrut Federation of London or local rabbis of Chabad Lubavitch of Barcelona. One of the most obvious challenges that winemakers face each year is timing: in Spain, the harvest of red grapes begins in early September and often falls each year during the Jewish peak season. If the winemakers don’t plan well in advance, it all translates into a disastrous production season.

However, not all Sephardic Jews currently producing wine in Spain have returned. Some never left.

This is the case of Miguel Fernández de Arcaya, CEO of Bodegas Fernández de Arcaya in Los Arcos, Navarre, heir to his family’s precious Jewish wine heritage. In 1492, Fernández de Arcaya’s ancestors fled to the Kingdom of Navarre, a part of modern-day Spain where many Jews sought refuge in order to live a hidden Jewish life.

A view of the Clos Mesorah winery in 2018 (David Silverman / Getty Images / via JTA)

Miguel is responsible for preserving his family’s medieval Sephardic Kosher method and history of kosher winemaking through Alate Kosher, a wine created through a long, rigorous and secret process using ancient biodynamic principles and vines. hundred-year-old Iberians.

The result is a mouth-filling tempranillo – the most popular red variety in Spain – which on the nose is reminiscent of plum and ripe cherry with a hint of earthy tobacco.

“Kosher is purity, a wine without additives, made with natural and controlled processes,” said Fernández de Arcaya. “For us [the Sephardim], wine is an art of living and not a profession. It has always been so. We make wine out of this need for us Sephardic Jews to have our own product and to be able to provide 100 percent Orthodox wine. All in accordance with the religious observance of the Torah.

Aletá and Cohen see their work as a continuation of the Jews’ connection to the physical land of Spain.

“We are crossing this land, and the vines will stay there. We are only one element in nature; part of biodiversity, ”Cohen said. “This is our contribution. That is to say ‘mesorah, ‘Jewish tradition through the generations.


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