Fine Wines – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-150x150.png Fine Wines – Vins Jean De Monteil http://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/ 32 32 Raymond J., Sr NOWAK | Celebration of life https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/raymond-j-sr-nowak-celebration-of-life/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/raymond-j-sr-nowak-celebration-of-life/ NOWAK – Raymond J., Sr. Raymond J. Nowak Sr. This is the story of Raymond J. Nowak, Sr. of Lewiston, NY who passed away peacefully on November 2, 2021 at home. Ray was one of a kind, a most unique individual. He was a talented musician who played and loved all kinds of music (especially […]]]>

NOWAK – Raymond J., Sr. Raymond J. Nowak Sr. This is the story of Raymond J. Nowak, Sr. of Lewiston, NY who passed away peacefully on November 2, 2021 at home. Ray was one of a kind, a most unique individual. He was a talented musician who played and loved all kinds of music (especially blues and reggae). His creativity and artistic abilities were evident in his paintings and the many homemade cards he often created for others. Ray was especially looking forward to spending time with his friends and family. He enjoyed entertaining and found pleasure in his creative and exceptional culinary talents as well as in his knowledge of fine wines that he loved to share with everyone. He loved history and had an ongoing love of learning. Ray always had a “system” for everything and was quite the character. He really enjoyed retired life in Lewiston. He was an endearing, funny, loyal and passionate man who loved life and was loved by those he met. Many of those who knew him have “a Raymond story” which often leads to a memorable laugh! He was a devoted husband, father, son, brother, cousin and friend who was loved, who we miss and who will always be cherished. There will never be another like him! Raymond’s story began on March 30, 1940, the eldest child of John & Joséphine (Darlak) Nowak and brother of Lorraine Karpiec (Ted). He was born in Buffalo, NY, where he made lifelong friends in a neighborhood where everyone took care of each other. He was proud to be a choir servant and a member of the church choir as a child. He spent his entire professional life (56 years) in the optical industry from which he finally retired in 2012. The relatives who paved the way for Raymond are his mother and father, his sister Lorraine (Lori), his Stepfather. , Joseph Jarosz, Sr., and many missed family and friends. He will also be very happy to be reunited with his beloved “watch cat”, Baby. Relatives Ray will miss until they reunite are his wife, Linda (Jarosz) Nowak; his son Raymond (RJ) Nowak Jr .; his stepmother, Theresa (Glomb) Jarosz; brother-in-law, Joseph Jarosz, Jr .; sisters-in-law, Genene Crofut (Peter) and Gretchen Hicks (Sean); and his most special cousin Norman Wesley. He is also survived by several beloved nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. A Christian funeral mass will be celebrated on Saturday, December 4, 2021 at St. Peter’s RC Church, 620 Center St., Lewiston, NY 14092 at 10 a.m. Please assemble at the church. Arrangements were made through Rhoney Funeral Home, Lewiston, NY. Donations in lieu of flowers can be made on Raymond’s behalf to Lewiston Council on the Arts, Lewiston Fire Co. # 1, or to a charity of your choice. Please visit www.rhoneyfuneralhome.com, for the guest register.


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Winemaker Igor Sill is Ambassador of Wine and Health – https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/winemaker-igor-sill-is-ambassador-of-wine-and-health/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 16:46:17 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/winemaker-igor-sill-is-ambassador-of-wine-and-health/ Atlas Peak Winemaker Says Grapes in Wine Are Naturally Healthy Magic By Igor Sill, Winegrower and Winegrower Napa Valley is well known around the world for its fine wines, and the wine country that surpasses all others is the famous Atlas Mountain region of Napa, the most sought after wine region. In addition to its […]]]>

Atlas Peak Winemaker Says Grapes in Wine Are Naturally Healthy Magic

By Igor Sill, Winegrower and Winegrower

Napa Valley is well known around the world for its fine wines, and the wine country that surpasses all others is the famous Atlas Mountain region of Napa, the most sought after wine region. In addition to its volcanic roots, the high altitude terroir, the artisanal production process and the ultra-quality wines give these charming vineyards and cellars their incomparable and naturally healthy magic.

Most of us are familiar with the many tourist-rich wineries in Napa Valley. Less well known are the small winemakers and artisanal winemakers located above the valley floor of the Atlas Peak volcanic region in Napa. Located just minutes north of downtown Napa on the Eastern Ridge of the Mountain, a getaway to Atlas Peak inspires exploration, curiosity, daring adventures while ensuring an unparalleled wine-making experience. The winding, winding road to Atlas Peak remains fringed with burnt oaks and rocks blackened by the Napa fires in 2017. Between the trees are modest-looking estates and pristine vineyards rescued from the ravages of the blaze. Even though it’s only minutes from the hustle and bustle of tourist-rich Napa, it remains an oasis of calm, the hidden beauty of the wine country.

Atlas Peak is Napa’s highest point at 2263 ′ above sea level. Its main artery, Atlas Peak Road, takes you to new heights with its purity of air, serenity and diverse wildlife that offers breathtaking views and heartfelt experiences that transport you back in time. You’ll discover local artisanal winemakers and ruggedly elegant wineries offering award-winning, artisan mountain wines that express a genuine sense of place. Throughout the climb, cyclists ride up and down the mountain through endless acres of scenic countryside with majestic old oak trees guarding the road that protects them.

These mountain vineyards survived the fire of 2017 and have remained home to generations of winegrowers whose passion for creating the exquisite wines of the world remains their sole focus. The majority of Atlas Peak winemakers cultivate organically, which better promotes grapevine health and may have saved much of the Atlas Peak vineyards from the ravages of fires. Harnessing these soils is extremely difficult, but well worth the effort to respect Mother Nature and allow Atlas Peak to produce exceptionally fine wines as they have been since 1870.

The purity of the cool mountain rain is why some high altitude vineyards are awarded year after year. Valley-bottom vineyards absorb their water from rivers, lakes, runoff and, in some cases, municipal water sources. No two water sources are the same and they do not have the same levels of purity and nutrients. I doubt anyone who prefers to drink raw river or lake water rather than water from a Fijian bottle (known to “bring The best of the earth From water to World”!). Most of Atlas Peak’s vineyards are dry grown due to its volcanic soil’s ability to hold cool rainwater and hold moisture for months. So they don’t irrigate much, relying on the purity of direct precipitation from the sky to nourish the vines for much of the growing season.

Dr. Miranda Hart of the University of British Columbia Okanagan studies soil biodiversity to better understand soil microbial communities. “Soil biodiversity can be an important part of the terroir, which is everything for a winegrower,” she said.

“The microbes in the soil of the vineyard stimulate the defense mechanisms of the plants,” adds Dr Hart, explaining that this is especially important for wine grape vines, because “the flavor elements that people get excited about – flavonoids and antioxidants – are secondary metabolites, ‘produced when plants experience stress. “Plants have a very sophisticated immune system and they deter herbivores or create antimicrobial agents, and the chemistry of this is very important to the sensory profile of the grape.”

In the afternoon, the heat from the valley floor begins to drift towards the mountain sides as the grapes soak up the sun. As night falls, the grapes close together, interrupting photosynthesis, sugar formation and acidity, locking their structure and backbone. They warm up the next day, begin their photosynthesis, and the cycle continues. From the rhythm of nature and the diurnal changes, the grapes have more balance, structure and complexity.

Igor Sill, Winemaker and Winemaker in Napa Valley

The mountains are more exposed to the prevailing breezes, which adds more stress to the vines. Essentially, upper mountain vineyards benefit in several ways compared to valley bottom vines. They receive more concentrated sunlight, greater temperature changes, and much better drainage that creates natural stress for the vines as they struggle to develop a greater concentration of pigment. As a result, they produce less grapes, but with more intense aromas, flavors, colors and tannins. The elements of the grape evolve more slowly and age much more gracefully. This high altitude stress is directly correlated with better quality wine grapes.

It is easy to see that there are certain places on our planet that are more ideal for growing the Cabernet Sauvignon grape. As they say, “great wine is made in the vineyard, not in the laboratory. Location, location, location is everything.

Every year there is a flurry of headlines announcing the health benefits of mountain red wine, as if ripe berry flavors and perfect structure weren’t enough reasons to seek out high altitude wines. Evidence continues to support that red wines grown at higher altitudes possess higher levels of healthy antioxidant properties, gaining a reputation as the elixir of life. This growing body of evidence suggests that drinking red wine in moderation may reduce oxidative damage responsible for the aging process and many degenerative diseases.

“Red wine has been shown to have a beneficial effect on preventing heart disease. The mechanism of this benefit is not yet known, but we have been drinking wine for many centuries and, in addition to the joy it brings, scientists are working with winegrowers to better understand its effects on health, ”he said. said Dr David Agus, professor. of Medicine and Engineering, University of Southern California. He is also the author of several books, including “The End of Illness”, “A Short Guide to a Long Life” and “The Lucky Years: How to prosper in the brave new world of health”.

For decades, Dr Chris Cates has worked as an interventional cardiologist, recommending that heart patients keep their hearts healthy by enjoying a glass of red wine every day. “Ever since we learned that wine was beneficial in a study group called ‘The French Paradox’… .. it really showed that the French live longer than the Americans,” Cates said. “What really rocked all of this was the importance of red wine and the polyphenols and antioxidants in wine.”

Basically, plants synthesize the antioxidant resveratrol in response to natural UV light from the sun. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic antioxidant found in certain plants, such as grapes. These phenolic acids provide some of the most important building blocks in wine quality and are, quite possibly, responsible for the health benefits of red wine.

Ffrom Harvard Medical School, online guide: Foods that fight inflammation:Grapes. These succulent fruits are packed with fiber, vitamins C and K, and powerful phytochemicals, especially the resveratrol found in red grapes. It’s no wonder that moderate consumption of red wine has been linked to heart health. The results of a seven-year multi-ethnic study of 3,300 middle-aged women linked moderate wine consumption to significantly lower levels of inflammation, compared to women who drank no or less. wine. Some more recent studies, however, have questioned some of these benefits. It’s important to note, however, that even moderate alcohol consumption (including wine) has been associated with a higher cancer risk. Top tip: If you already love wine, drink it in moderation (one glass per day maximum for women, two glasses for men), but don’t start drinking it for purported health benefits.

So, I claim that some of the finest and healthiest wines produced are high altitude mountain wines. Pour a few ounces of red wine grown in volcanic tuff into a tall wineglass, swirl it around, put your nose into the glass and inhale deeply to fully absorb its aromas and flavors. You will be greeted with a large bouquet of floral sensations, followed by notes of berries, spices and earth dancing in your nose. These wines are much more expressive, pure and aromatic due to the higher altitude, cleaner air, volcanic soil and the soil’s natural nutrient content, ”says Atlas Peak winemaker Igor Sill . “These vines are healthier, fresher and, despite their stress, happier and potentially healthy for you.”

Igor Sill living his dream by pursuing his passion for perfection by cultivating a mountain vineyard on Atlas Peak Mountain in Napa. He is a naturalist, wine enthusiast, winemaker, wine grower, writer, Court of Master Sommeliers, participated in the UC Davis winemaking program, member of the Napa Valley Wine Technical Group, judge for the International Wine Challenge, London; and holds a Masters degree from the University of Oxford. Many thanks to Dr David Agus, Dr Miranda Hart, artHartDr. Chris Cates, Harvard Medical School and the genius Laura Pauli for their help, ideas and much appreciated contributions to this article


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Dynasty Fine Wines Group (HKG: 828) Seeks To Continue To Increase Its Returns On Capital https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/dynasty-fine-wines-group-hkg-828-seeks-to-continue-to-increase-its-returns-on-capital/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 23:49:58 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/dynasty-fine-wines-group-hkg-828-seeks-to-continue-to-increase-its-returns-on-capital/ To find multi-bagger stock, what are the underlying trends we need to look for in a business? Generally, we will want to notice a growing trend to recover on capital employed (ROCE) and at the same time, a based capital employed. This shows us that it is a composing machine, capable of continually reinvesting its […]]]>

To find multi-bagger stock, what are the underlying trends we need to look for in a business? Generally, we will want to notice a growing trend to recover on capital employed (ROCE) and at the same time, a based capital employed. This shows us that it is a composing machine, capable of continually reinvesting its profits into the business and generating higher returns. So when we looked Dynasty Fine Wines Group (HKG: 828) and its trend of ROCE, we really liked what we saw.

Understanding Return on Capital Employed (ROCE)

For those who don’t know what ROCE is, it measures the amount of pre-tax profit a business can generate from the capital employed in its business. The formula for this calculation on Dynasty Fine Wines Group is:

Return on capital employed = Profit before interest and taxes (EBIT) ÷ (Total assets – Current liabilities)

0.028 = HK $ 6.8million ÷ (HK $ 596million – HK $ 357million) (Based on the last twelve months up to June 2021).

So, The Dynasty Fine Wines group posted a ROCE of 2.8%. In absolute terms, that’s a low yield and it’s also below the beverage industry average of 11%.

Check out our latest analysis for Dynasty Fine Wines Group

SEHK: 828 Return on capital employed on December 1, 2021

Although the past is not representative of the future, it can be useful to know the historical performance of a company, which is why we have this graph above. If you would like to see how Dynasty Fine Wines Group has performed in the past in other measures, you can see this free graph of past income, income and cash flow.

What can we say about the ROCE trend of Dynasty Fine Wines Group?

It’s great to see that Dynasty Fine Wines Group has started to generate pre-tax profits from past investments. The company was posting losses five years ago, but now it has recovered, gaining 2.8%, which is no doubt a relief for some of the early shareholders. At first glance, it seems that the company is increasingly skilled at generating returns, as over the same period the amount of capital employed has decreased by 46%. Dynasty Fine Wines Group could sell underperforming assets as ROCE improves.

Another thing to note, Dynasty Fine Wines Group has a high ratio of current liabilities to total assets of 60%. This can lead to some risks as the business is basically operating with quite a lot of dependence on its suppliers or other types of short term creditors. While this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it can be beneficial if this ratio is lower.

Our opinion on the ROCE of Dynasty Fine Wines Group

From what we have seen above, Dynasty Fine Wines Group has been successful in increasing its returns on capital while reducing its capital base. Since the stock has only returned 6.5% to shareholders in the past year, promising fundamentals may not yet be recognized by investors. Therefore, further exploring this stock might reveal a good opportunity, if valuation and other metrics stack up.

Like most businesses, Dynasty Fine Wines Group carries certain risks, and we have found 2 warning signs that you need to be aware of.

For those who like to invest in solid companies, Check it out free list of companies with strong balance sheets and high returns on equity.

Do you have any feedback on this item? Are you worried about the content? Get in touch with us directly. You can also send an email to the editorial team (at) simplywallst.com.

This Simply Wall St article is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts using only unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock and does not take into account your goals or your financial situation. Our aim is to bring you long-term, targeted analysis based on fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not take into account the latest announcements from price sensitive companies or qualitative documents. Simply Wall St has no position in any of the stocks mentioned.


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Museum experience raises $ 250,000 for McCallum Education https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/museum-experience-raises-250000-for-mccallum-education/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 18:11:15 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/museum-experience-raises-250000-for-mccallum-education/ “Oh what a night!” became the evening exclamation at Circle of Muses and Patron Saint of the McCallum Theater event of the same name. It was truly a museum experience, raising over $ 250,000. During cocktail hour, revelers were greeted by 1960s music performed by The killer dueling pianos. The music made the guests clap, […]]]>

“Oh what a night!” became the evening exclamation at Circle of Muses and Patron Saint of the McCallum Theater event of the same name. It was truly a museum experience, raising over $ 250,000.

During cocktail hour, revelers were greeted by 1960s music performed by The killer dueling pianos. The music made the guests clap, laugh and sing, and most of the attendees, having survived the 1960s, knew all the lyrics. A photo booth captured guests in chic cocktail period outfits and an artist sketched out caricatures.

The doors to the Westin Mission Hills Resort Celebrity Ballroom were opened as elated celebrants enjoyed the glitzy decor. Large crystal lights adorned the center of each table surrounded by a mixture of fresh flowers. The chair covers were adorned with a glittering herringbone pattern in gold and white, matching the table runners.

Muse board member Marge Barry, Kay Hanson and CJ Westrick-Bomar smile at the "Oh what a night" fundraiser at the Westin Mission Hills Resort on November 14, 2021.

Co-chair of the event Judith Antoine welcomed the guests and thanked everyone for their support of McCallum Theater Education. She said: “Last season, when school children couldn’t be in their classrooms, McCallum Theater Education served over 31,000 students and educators through virtual and online programming. Bringing the arts into the homes of young people helped ease the isolation that many felt. “

McCallum staff Yvonne bell, Melissa Credazzi-Clark, Colleen Gallagher, Mitch gershenfeld, Robert mcconnaughey, Nicole Moon, Jeffrey Normand, Dio Perez, Dominique shwe and Ratna williams were recognized for their dedication and support.


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Sale of six liters of DRC wine “canceled” due to counterfeiting concerns https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/sale-of-six-liters-of-drc-wine-canceled-due-to-counterfeiting-concerns/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 09:14:18 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/sale-of-six-liters-of-drc-wine-canceled-due-to-counterfeiting-concerns/ Acker announced in September that it had sold a six-liter bottle of 2002 “Romanée-Conti” from Domaine de la Romanée-Conti (DRC) at an auction in Hong Kong for nearly HK $ 3.1 million ( US $ 398,400). However, it is understood that the sale of the bottle was subsequently canceled. Doubts about the authenticity of the […]]]>

Acker announced in September that it had sold a six-liter bottle of 2002 “Romanée-Conti” from Domaine de la Romanée-Conti (DRC) at an auction in Hong Kong for nearly HK $ 3.1 million ( US $ 398,400).

However, it is understood that the sale of the bottle was subsequently canceled.

Doubts about the authenticity of the wine have been raised by lawyer and wine fraud expert Don Cornwell on the Wine Beserkers website.

He also expressed concerns about another wine, a six-liter bottle of DRC Romanée-Conti 2000, which was originally due to be included in an Acker auction earlier this month.

When approached for comment, Acker said he removed Romanée-Conti 2000 wine from his pre-auction sale list.

In a statement sent by email to Carafe, Acker said: “The six-liter [bottle] of 2000 DRC Romanée-Conti was printed in the auction catalog, but after our final inspection was completed, we removed the lot before the auction.

On the doubts raised by Romanée-Conti 2002, Acker adds: “Regarding the six-liter [bottle] of 2002 DRC Romanée-Conti recently sold at an earlier auction, the sale had already been canceled. ‘

Acker also said, “We have a long-standing practice that if we find a bottle is not genuine, we will refund the buyer. Acker places great trust in our authentication service and works with some of the best internal and external authenticators in the world.

“Obviously our customers are confident in our processes as we will have a record $ 170 million in auctions this year, which represents 40% of the global auction market. We will continue to do our best to detect and prevent bad players in the fine and rare wine market. ‘

The famous RDC of Burgundy produces some of the most exclusive and sought-after fine wines in the world, and the estate’s labels have been the target of counterfeiters, as well as thieves.


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Balmoral’s number one Emma Lonie wins Hotel Restaurant Manager of the Year award https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/balmorals-number-one-emma-lonie-wins-hotel-restaurant-manager-of-the-year-award/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 16:49:35 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/balmorals-number-one-emma-lonie-wins-hotel-restaurant-manager-of-the-year-award/ Emma Lonie We often celebrate the chefs and forget about the rest of the hardworking teams that run any restaurant. However, now number one at The BalmoralRestaurant manager Emma Lonie has been honored with one of the UK’s top façade awards. She won the Hotel Restaurant Manager of the Year award at the 2021 Cateys […]]]>
Emma Lonie

We often celebrate the chefs and forget about the rest of the hardworking teams that run any restaurant.

However, now number one at The BalmoralRestaurant manager Emma Lonie has been honored with one of the UK’s top façade awards. She won the Hotel Restaurant Manager of the Year award at the 2021 Cateys Hotel, which is managed by hospitality industry publication The Caterer, and took place at a ceremony in London on November 19.

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“It’s a real honor to be recognized,” says Lonie. “I am extremely privileged to be a part of Number One and The Balmoral, to work with a dedicated and creative team who share my passion for food, wine, people and travel.”

Lonie has been at the Five Star Hotel in Edinburgh, Balmoral’s number one fine dining restaurant, which has one Michelin star, four AA Rosettes and won CIS Restaurant of the Year 2021, for 14 years. She has worked alongside various chefs and chefs, from Jeff Bland to Marc Donald, pastry chef, Ross sneddon, and their most recent appointment, Matthieu sherry, who took over the kitchen earlier this year. She is an integral part of the team and her work is not limited to administrative tasks.

“I oversee all frontage operations at Number One, working closely with Head Chef Mathew Sherry and Head Sommelier Damien Trinkquel. We strive to provide the ultimate dining experience with a seven-course menu featuring our favorite seasonal produce, ”said Lonie. “We work with a large collection of fine wines, over 350 by the bottle, over 20 by the glass and a large collection of whiskey as well. We also work closely with all of our suppliers to showcase the finest ingredients and share the history of our hotel, restaurant, seasonal products and team through every menu and dining experience. “

Another award was brought back to Scotland by this year’s Cateys Hotel. This was presented to Rosie Wilkins from another five-star hotel, The Torridon by Achnasheen in Wester Ross, which won the Front of House Manager of the Year 2021 award.Number one at Balmoral, 1 Princes Street, Edinburgh, www.roccofortehotels.com

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Flying kangaroo reconnecting Victoria with the world https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/flying-kangaroo-reconnecting-victoria-with-the-world/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 23:24:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/flying-kangaroo-reconnecting-victoria-with-the-world/ Qantas international flights from Melbourne take off again today for the first time in 20 months after the pandemic blocked international travel. The national airline will resume scheduled international flights from Melbourne today, with flight QF35 to Singapore departing at 11:50 am. Qantas also announced the launch of an all-new international route from Melbourne to […]]]>

Qantas international flights from Melbourne take off again today for the first time in 20 months after the pandemic blocked international travel.

The national airline will resume scheduled international flights from Melbourne today, with flight QF35 to Singapore departing at 11:50 am.

Qantas also announced the launch of an all-new international route from Melbourne to Delhi from December 22, 2021, connecting Victoria to the Indian capital on a flight operated by Qantas for the first time in the airline’s history.

The new Melbourne-Delhi flight will operate four times a week, year round. Same day connections will also be available from Brisbane, Sydney and Canberra. Flights from Melbourne to Delhi will initially operate via Adelaide, while flights from Delhi to Melbourne will operate non-stop.

This follows the recent announcement of flights from Sydney to Delhi, which will begin next month. When that route went on sale, Qantas saw the biggest increase in bookings for flights departing from Australia since the airline announced its international restart plans in August.

Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce said relaunching international flights from Victoria would pave the way for a long-awaited reunion with loved ones, and help the state maintain its position as one of the top destinations Australian for global travelers.

“The Victorians have done more difficult than most over the past two years and we believe many will see the restart of Qantas international flights as another important step towards getting back to normal,” Joyce said.

“We are starting to see more and more Victorians booking a well-deserved international getaway, and as the borders open up to international visitors we expect to see them visiting Melbourne in large numbers, which will give a boost. local tourism and hospitality businesses.

“The restart of our international flights is only possible because of the way the Victorians and Australians more broadly rolled up their sleeves to get the jab.

“While the past 20 months have undoubtedly been the toughest in Qantas history, as we emerge from the crisis, we are seizing new opportunities to expand our network in response to unprecedented pent-up travel demand. It helps us bring more Qantas employees back to work.

Qantas will also relaunch Melbourne-London flights on November 27, 2021 and Melbourne-Los Angeles from December 19, 2021.

While the international travel experience is largely the same as it was before COVID, some things will look and feel a bit different, especially in the short term.

Qantas has rolled out a range of new initiatives including a personalized digital travel guide designed to help passengers navigate travel requirements before leaving their homes.

The launch of international flights coincides with the opening of Qantas First Lounge at Melbourne International Airport.

Although normally reserved for Platinum Frequent Flyers members, Qantas will invite business customers, Gold Frequent Flyers and Qantas Club members to visit the First Lounge until the neighboring Business Lounge reopens.

Guests will be treated to a hybrid dining experience designed by Neil Perry that includes some of the most popular menu items from First and Business Lounges, such as Salt and Pepper Squid with Green Chilli Dip, Pork and Pork Lasagna. Neil’s veal and signature pavlova, as well as fine wines and barista coffee.

For a limited time, the menu will also feature chicken satays and vegetable samosas to celebrate the restart of Singapore flights and new Melbourne-Delhi flights.

Qantas has reopened nearly all of its 35 national Qantas Club and Business lounges across Australia.

It will open the rest of its international lounges in Australia and abroad in line with the wider reopening of international borders and the restart of the rest of Qantas’ international network.

Singapore’s International Business Lounge is scheduled to open in early December. In the meantime, eligible guests can use the SATS lounge in Singapore.

All passengers on Qantas international flights must be fully immunized, unless they are under 12 years old, 12 to 17 years old traveling to Australia with their family or guardian, or have an exemption. For all the details, visit qantas.com.

Initial international flights are limited to Australian citizens, permanent residents, and their immediate families and relatives, in accordance with federal government requirements. This is expected to be rolled out to other travelers in the coming months.

International flights are subject to government and regulatory approval

/ Public distribution. This material from the original organization / authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). here.


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Cyprus wine industry presented to the world https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/cyprus-wine-industry-presented-to-the-world/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 13:10:14 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/cyprus-wine-industry-presented-to-the-world/ A prestigious sommelier competition was held on the island this week, won by a Sicilian who now works in London What a great week it has been for the wine world in Cyprus! The 14the The competition for the prestigious ASI (Association de la Sommellerie Internationale) Best Sommelier in Europe and Africa ended on Friday […]]]>
A prestigious sommelier competition was held on the island this week, won by a Sicilian who now works in London

What a great week it has been for the wine world in Cyprus! The 14the The competition for the prestigious ASI (Association de la Sommellerie Internationale) Best Sommelier in Europe and Africa ended on Friday afternoon at the Rialto Theater in Limassol, in a very tense final. A live audience watched Salvatore Castano of Italy named Best Sommelier in Europe and Africa, beating Nina Jensen of Denmark, who came second, and Suvad Zlatic of Austria, who came third.

“I’ve never won anything before!” declared the new ASI Best Sommelier of Europe and Africa. However, he has been a close finalist in previous international sommelier competitions. In 2018, he obtained the highest mark for any student passing his advanced exams at the Court of Master Sommeliers. Castano is originally from Sicily but now works in London at the wine company Friarwood Fine Wines.

The 34 candidates from Europe and Africa who started at the start of the week were reduced to just 10 semi-finalists on Tuesday evening. This was decided by blind tastings, practical and written tests, when all the candidates were closely examined on their service, their tasting and their theory.

During the final live in front of a full house, the three sommeliers were responsible for several practical actions carried out in a restaurant setting. The judges played the role of the diners to experience firsthand the skills and knowledge of the competitors. The ASI technical committee was chaired by Oliver Poussier, world champion in 2000. The other judges included former world champions, master sommeliers and wine masters. Castano drew the short straw and had to go through a series of role-playing actions first, each of which was strictly timed.

Winner Salvatore Castano

First, applicants had to prepare and serve a cocktail from a list provided for a table of three, in four minutes. Then they had to identify a selected wine and offer a full sound tasting to the audience. For the next task, they had to choose a red wine from a cellar made available to accompany Sole Meunière. The selected wine was to be decanted and served to the guests at the table on stage, with the previous winner of the title playing the role of the host. After this seven-minute exercise, the finalists were asked to identify five wines and rank them from driest to sweetest. They were then asked to come up with a four-course menu to pair with four of the five wines. The final parts of the gigantic test included identifying three drinks and correcting a wine list with lots of mistakes and fabricated information. Throughout their exercises, all of the finalists demonstrated a vast knowledge of their subject matter to an audience of dignitaries, competitors and the general public, including via a live YouTube link.

Castano now automatically qualifies as a continental winner and will participate in the ASI competition for the best sommelier in the world, which will take place in Paris in 2023.

The final concluded the week-long competition, which began on Monday with the arrival of competitors, presidents of European and African sommelier associations, journalists and dignitaries. Throughout the week, visiting delegates enjoyed Cypriot hospitality, dining at some of the best restaurants on the island, participating in wine masterclasses and visiting local vineyards. The competition has undoubtedly placed Cypriot wine on the global wine list and was even filmed by a visiting BBC crew as part of a series they are currently producing on the sommeliers.

“Last week in Cyprus has been wonderful,” said ASI President William Wouters. “After postponing the competition twice due to the pandemic, the Cypriot team, led by George Kassianos, finally succeeded. They have shown a fantastic sense of flexibility and goodwill. The organization in beautiful Limassol, the hospitality, the unique welcome, the exceptional food and the very interesting local wines will be etched in our memories for a long time.

It was a huge task of organization and skill to take care of all the delegates and to organize such a successful competition.

“We proudly showcased the legendary food, wine culture and hospitality of Cyprus and introduced our island to the world,” said Cyprus Sommelier Association President Kassianos.


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Red wines from Greece to savor https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/red-wines-from-greece-to-savor/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 20:53:45 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/red-wines-from-greece-to-savor/ No, I don’t think it’s fear so much as ignorance, as a few readers have suggested, although it’s true that what separates those feelings can sometimes be a fine line. “Being new to Greek reds, I find their names distracting complexity,” said Shweta of Michigan. And, referring to a Greek varietal, Bunk McNulty of Northampton, […]]]>

No, I don’t think it’s fear so much as ignorance, as a few readers have suggested, although it’s true that what separates those feelings can sometimes be a fine line.

“Being new to Greek reds, I find their names distracting complexity,” said Shweta of Michigan. And, referring to a Greek varietal, Bunk McNulty of Northampton, Mass., (A late alias derived from “Thread“, I hope) said:” Agiorghtiko doesn’t exactly come out of the American language. “

Perhaps, with an additional complication: Greek words must be transliterated from the Greek alphabet into the English alphabet. This does not happen consistently, so most Greek grapes have multiple spellings in English. Unlike Bunk McNulty, for example, I would use the spelling “agiorgitiko” which is preferred by the authoritative book “Wine grapes, rather than the alternative spelling “agiorghtiko”.

Here at Wine School, we are keenly aware of the subtle messages conveyed by words and language, and the discomfort that can arise when faced with something new. Wine is quite difficult and intimidating in any language. Add a different alphabet and it’s easy to get overwhelmed.

This is to be expected, and it is a testament to the important role restaurants and sommeliers play in familiarizing the public with new and different wines. In my introductory article on Greek red wines, I alluded to the few opportunities to learn more about Greek wines, in part because few restaurants exist to play a significant educational role, just like the scarcity of German and Austrian restaurants does not help Americans feel more comfortable. with Germanic wines.

One wine, the grüner veltliner, is an exception to this notion. By the turn of the 21st century, grüner was virtually unknown to Americans, but it quickly became a popular restaurant wine. How did it happen? Sommeliers adopted it, transcending national borders. American restaurants have started serving it by the glass, with bartenders and waiters ready to reassure hesitant people at the table.

I don’t expect that to happen with the Greek reds. It will be a long journey with many small steps including the first one, just trying the wines because they have so much to offer. As usual, I have offered three bottles to drink in the past month.


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Wine Guy: Tuscany offers much more than Chianti | Way of life https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wine-guy-tuscany-offers-much-more-than-chianti-way-of-life/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://vins-jean-de-monteil.com/wine-guy-tuscany-offers-much-more-than-chianti-way-of-life/ While Chianti is the best-known Tuscan wine, a small survey reveals a wide variety of fine selections from the region, especially in southern Tuscany around Siena and in the Maremma near the Tyrrhenian Sea. Most wines use Sangiovese as a base, usually blended with other native grapes, and increasingly Bordeaux grapes. Typically, the wines exhibit […]]]>

While Chianti is the best-known Tuscan wine, a small survey reveals a wide variety of fine selections from the region, especially in southern Tuscany around Siena and in the Maremma near the Tyrrhenian Sea.

Most wines use Sangiovese as a base, usually blended with other native grapes, and increasingly Bordeaux grapes. Typically, the wines exhibit bright cherry fruit, a firm, dry structure, and earthy qualities.

Carmignano (a few miles northwest of Florence) has been popular since the 1700s. Today wines must contain at least 50% Sangiovese and 10-20% Cabernet Sauvignon or Cabernet Franc. Small amounts of other grapes are allowed.

A few kilometers east of Florence, in the Chianti Rufina subzone, is the tiny denomination Pomino. Its Rosso (red) wines require at least 50% Sangiovese, up to 50% Merlot or Pinot Noir and up to 25% other red grapes.

Montepulciano, south-east of Siena, is home to the Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. Its name reflects its popularity with royalty over the centuries. Wines must contain at least 70% sangiovese (locally called prugnolo gentile) blended with other local grape varieties.

West of Montepulciano, the southern Maremma is drawing more and more attention to Morellino di Scansano. Named after the village of Scansano and the local name for Sangiovese (wine should contain at least 85%), the growing conditions here favor smooth and inviting wines.

The most famous part of the Maremma lies along the coast in the Bolgheri region. It is home to famous Super Tuscans like Sassicaia, Guado al Tasso and Ornellaia.

And now the wines:

Capezzana Carmignano

• 2018 Barco Reale ($ 18) 75% Sangiovese; fresh for early enjoyment

• 2016 Carmignano ($ 30) 80% sangiovese, 20% cabernet sauvignon; powerful and powerful tannins

• 2013 Ghiaie della Furba ($ 51) 40% cabernet sauvignon, 35% syrah, 25% merlot; mature, inviting

• 2015 Trefiano Riserva ($ 59) from prime vineyards surrounding Villa di Trefiano; 80% sangiovese; juicy, rich, elegant

Selvapiana Pomino Rosso

• 2015 Villa Petrognano ($ 21) 60% sangiovese, 20% merlot, 20% cabernet sauvignon; intense, smoky

Poliziano Vino Nobile

di Montepulciano

• Rosso di Montepulciano 2019 ($ 17) 80% sangiovese, 20% merlot; Costs

• 2017 Vino Nobile di Montepulciano ($ 30) 85% Sangiovese; bright, earthy

• 2017 Asinone ($ 63) limited production; 95% sangiovese; succulent, rich, solidly structured

Morellino di Scansano

• 2018 Lohsa ($ 16) 85% morellino; fresh, silky

Bolgheri

• 2109 Le Volte dell’Ornellaia ($ 34) merlot, cabernet sauvignon and sangiovese; deep fruit, fresh herbs, nice balance

• 2107 Tassinaïa ($ 34); almost equal percentages of cabernet sauvignon and merlot; firm, earthy, inviting


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